Discussion:
Is it a girls name, a boys name or both?
(too old to reply)
Tarla
2004-01-14 16:16:26 UTC
Permalink
"Darcy"
Nicolaas Hawkins
2004-01-14 17:52:10 UTC
Permalink
In Message <news:***@4ax.com>
dated Thu, 15 Jan 2004 05:16:26 +1300,
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
I've known it used for both, just as with Kerry and Robin. Also as a
surname in the format D'Arcy.
--
Regards,
Nicolaas.



- People on ego trips should do others a favour and buy one-way tickets.
Miche
2004-01-14 18:46:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Boy.

Miche
--
If you want to end war and stuff you got to sing loud.
-- Arlo Guthrie, "Alice's Restaurant"
Sue Bilstein
2004-01-14 23:28:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Boy.
Yup.
David Springthorpe
2004-01-15 01:40:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Boy.
Yup.
As long as you're not a Boy Named Sue.....

DS
Sue Bilstein
2004-01-15 07:49:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Springthorpe
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Boy.
Yup.
As long as you're not a Boy Named Sue.....
I subscribed to Sky recently & they sent me an account addressed to Mr Sue
Jensen (Jensen is my RL surname). Probably thought I'm a male Chinese:
Sue Jen Sen, has a certain ring to it.
Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
2004-01-16 11:18:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sue Bilstein
I subscribed to Sky recently & they sent me an account addressed to Mr Sue
Sue Jen Sen, has a certain ring to it.
I was led to understand once that "Ms" is a suitable term of address for
either sex, but I'm not so sure...
Tarla
2004-01-16 19:56:24 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 00:18:07 +1300, Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Sue Bilstein
I subscribed to Sky recently & they sent me an account addressed to Mr Sue
Sue Jen Sen, has a certain ring to it.
I was led to understand once that "Ms" is a suitable term of address for
either sex, but I'm not so sure...
As far as I am aware, it has never been a suitable term for men. They
already have a marriage neutral honorific: Mr.

Ms. as a term of address was coined in the 70's and was meant only for
women to use as a neutral form.
Lennier
2004-01-17 00:24:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
As far as I am aware, it has never been a suitable term for men. They
already have a marriage neutral honorific: Mr.
Just as women have "Miss" men have "Master".

Just as women have "Mrs" men likewise have "Mr".

"Ms" is a term for a spinster. There is no equivalent for an older
unmarried man.



Lennier
--
"When dealing with the Religious Right one should remember that 'truth'
is not a part of the rules of their game."
Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
2004-01-17 01:45:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lennier
Post by Tarla
As far as I am aware, it has never been a suitable term for men. They
already have a marriage neutral honorific: Mr.
Just as women have "Miss" men have "Master".
The term for women would be "Mistress".
Post by Lennier
Just as women have "Mrs" men likewise have "Mr".
I believe "Mrs" literally means "wife of". Say Jane Jones marries John
Smith. It is not correct to refer to her as "Mrs Jane Smith". The
correct forms are either "Mrs John Smith" or "Jane, Mrs Smith".

For example, when George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion" was first performed
in 1914, the part of Eliza Doolittle was played by Mrs Patrick Campbell.
"Patrick" was her husband's name, not her name.
Post by Lennier
"Ms" is a term for a spinster. There is no equivalent for an older
unmarried man.
You're confusing "Miss" and "Ms". The latter was designed to be
marriage-status-neutral.
Peter Metcalfe
2004-01-17 02:10:32 UTC
Permalink
In article <ldo-***@news.wave.co.nz>, ***@geek-
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Lennier
Just as women have "Mrs" men likewise have "Mr".
I believe "Mrs" literally means "wife of".
It's an abbreviation of Mistress.
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Say Jane Jones marries John
Smith. It is not correct to refer to her as "Mrs Jane Smith".
Unless John Smith is dead according to the hoary convention.

--Peter Metcalfe
Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
2004-01-17 03:30:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Metcalfe
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
I believe "Mrs" literally means "wife of".
It's an abbreviation of Mistress.
That may have been its origin, but I think it now has a different
meaning. Hence, "Mrs Patrick Campbell" does not mean "Mistress Patrick
Campbell".
Peter Metcalfe
2004-01-17 03:35:27 UTC
Permalink
In article <ldo-***@news.wave.co.nz>, ***@geek-
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Peter Metcalfe
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
I believe "Mrs" literally means "wife of".
It's an abbreviation of Mistress.
That may have been its origin, but I think it now has a different
meaning. Hence, "Mrs Patrick Campbell" does not mean "Mistress Patrick
Campbell".
Then how can you argue what it "literally means" then?

--Peter Metcalfe
Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
2004-01-17 06:18:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Metcalfe
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Peter Metcalfe
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
I believe "Mrs" literally means "wife of".
It's an abbreviation of Mistress.
That may have been its origin, but I think it now has a different
meaning. Hence, "Mrs Patrick Campbell" does not mean "Mistress Patrick
Campbell".
Then how can you argue what it "literally means" then?
Because of the way it is (or was) used, as in the example above.
Peter Metcalfe
2004-01-17 06:21:25 UTC
Permalink
In article <ldo-***@news.wave.co.nz>, ***@geek-
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Peter Metcalfe
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
That may have been its origin, but I think it now has a different
meaning. Hence, "Mrs Patrick Campbell" does not mean "Mistress Patrick
Campbell".
Then how can you argue what it "literally means" then?
Because of the way it is (or was) used, as in the example above.
But "literally" does not mean that. Literally means what the
word says and the word "Mrs" literally does not mean wife of.

--Peter Metcalfe
Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
2004-01-17 07:41:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Metcalfe
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Peter Metcalfe
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
That may have been its origin, but I think it now has a different
meaning. Hence, "Mrs Patrick Campbell" does not mean "Mistress Patrick
Campbell".
Then how can you argue what it "literally means" then?
Because of the way it is (or was) used, as in the example above.
But "literally" does not mean that. Literally means what the
word says and the word "Mrs" literally does not mean wife of.
No, "lliterally" means "non-figuratively", as in "absent any rhetorical
devices". What something means "literally" now is not necessarily what
it "originally" "literally" meant. "Mrs" may originally have meant
"Mistress", but it certainly does not now, "literally" or otherwise.
Peter Metcalfe
2004-01-17 11:10:51 UTC
Permalink
In article <ldo-***@news.wave.co.nz>, ***@geek-
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Peter Metcalfe
But "literally" does not mean that. Literally means what the
word says and the word "Mrs" literally does not mean wife of.
No, "lliterally" means "non-figuratively", as in "absent any rhetorical
devices".
"Literally" literally does not mean "non-figuratively". It means
"in the exact words". Since the exact word is a condensation
of mistress, "Mrs" literally does not mean "wife of".
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
What something means "literally" now is not necessarily what
it "originally" "literally" meant.
But you haven't anything to show that the elements of "Mrs"
mean "wife of" and the definition of "Mrs" is not "wife of"
but a title for a married woman.
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
"Mrs" may originally have meant
"Mistress", but it certainly does not now, "literally" or otherwise.
So? The issue was whether "Mrs" meant "wife of" and on that
ground, you are literally wrong.

--Peter Metcalfe
Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
2004-01-17 12:03:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Metcalfe
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Peter Metcalfe
But "literally" does not mean that. Literally means what the
word says and the word "Mrs" literally does not mean wife of.
No, "lliterally" means "non-figuratively", as in "absent any rhetorical
devices".
"Literally" literally does not mean "non-figuratively". It means
"in the exact words".
No, that's a "quote".
Post by Peter Metcalfe
But you haven't anything to show that the elements of "Mrs"
mean "wife of" and the definition of "Mrs" is not "wife of"
but a title for a married woman.
But it was not traditionally used with the woman's own name, but with
the name of her husband, when referring to the woman. As in "Mrs Patrick
Campbell". Hence it was not a title for the woman, but an identification
of who she was the wife of.
Peter Metcalfe
2004-01-17 12:17:36 UTC
Permalink
In article <ldo-***@news.wave.co.nz>, ***@geek-
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Peter Metcalfe
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Peter Metcalfe
But "literally" does not mean that. Literally means what the
word says and the word "Mrs" literally does not mean wife of.
No, "lliterally" means "non-figuratively", as in "absent any rhetorical
devices".
"Literally" literally does not mean "non-figuratively". It means
"in the exact words".
No, that's a "quote".
No, the quotation marks are meant to make it clear which words
are part of the definition and which words are not.
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Peter Metcalfe
But you haven't anything to show that the elements of "Mrs"
mean "wife of" and the definition of "Mrs" is not "wife of"
but a title for a married woman.
But it was not traditionally used with the woman's own name,
but with the name of her husband, when referring to the woman.
So? Since you were saying before that it doesn't mean
Mistress now, you cannot appeal to tradition to determine
its meaning now.
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
As in "Mrs Patrick Campbell". Hence it was not a title for
the woman,
Wrong. Mrs is a title for a married women.

--Peter Metcalfe
Brian Dooley
2004-01-18 04:57:01 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 16:35:27 +1300, Peter Metcalfe
Post by Peter Metcalfe
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Peter Metcalfe
central.gen.new_zealand says...
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
I believe "Mrs" literally means "wife of".
It's an abbreviation of Mistress.
That may have been its origin, but I think it now has a different
meaning. Hence, "Mrs Patrick Campbell" does not mean "Mistress Patrick
Campbell".
Then how can you argue what it "literally means" then?
It depends on the time and place eg we know for certain that
unmarried women were referred to as Mrs in Pope's Letters ie
during the reign of George II.

'Miss' was originally just the slightly misspelt first syllable
of 'mistress'.
--
Brian Dooley

Wellington New Zealand
Lennier
2004-01-17 03:09:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Lennier
Just as women have "Mrs" men likewise have "Mr".
I believe "Mrs" literally means "wife of".
No - it's the abbreviation of "Mistress".


Lennier

--
Newsman - on CD piracy: "Entertainment meets Geekery meets Vengeance. It's
unstoppable. A match made in Heaven."
Lennier
2004-01-17 03:10:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro
Post by Lennier
"Ms" is a term for a spinster. There is no equivalent for an older
unmarried man.
You're confusing "Miss" and "Ms". The latter was designed to be
marriage-status-neutral.
"Miss" is the term for a girl.

"Mrs" is the term for a married woman.

"Ms" is the term for an unmarried woman.


Lennier

--
Newsman - on CD piracy: "Entertainment meets Geekery meets Vengeance. It's
unstoppable. A match made in Heaven."
Tarla
2004-01-17 02:37:50 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 13:24:32 +1300, Lennier
Post by Lennier
Post by Tarla
As far as I am aware, it has never been a suitable term for men. They
already have a marriage neutral honorific: Mr.
Just as women have "Miss" men have "Master".
Just as women have "Mrs" men likewise have "Mr".
"Ms" is a term for a spinster. There is no equivalent for an older
unmarried man.
Master refers to an underaged male, not an unmarried one. Ms is a term
that is marriage neutral despite what you say.
Lennier
2004-01-17 03:25:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
Master refers to an underaged male, not an unmarried one. Ms is a term
that is marriage neutral despite what you say.
The only people I know who use "Ms" are unmarried older women.

All married women I know of use "Mrs" - I know of none who use "Ms".

Come to think of it, the only woman - one only - I know who is married and
who does use "Ms" is a woman who didn't take her husband's name.


Lennier
--
"When dealing with the Religious Right one should remember that 'truth'
is not a part of the rules of their game."
Tarla
2004-01-17 07:31:12 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 16:25:12 +1300, Lennier
Post by Lennier
Post by Tarla
Master refers to an underaged male, not an unmarried one. Ms is a term
that is marriage neutral despite what you say.
The only people I know who use "Ms" are unmarried older women.
All married women I know of use "Mrs" - I know of none who use "Ms".
Come to think of it, the only woman - one only - I know who is married and
who does use "Ms" is a woman who didn't take her husband's name.
I have been married for 17 years now and I didn't take my husband's
name and use Ms. If you ever meet me, you'll know two.
Tarla
****
I shall ask for the abolition of the death penalty until I have the infallibility of human judgment demonstrated to me.
-Marquis de Lafayette
Sue Bilstein
2004-01-17 07:44:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 16:25:12 +1300, Lennier
Post by Lennier
The only people I know who use "Ms" are unmarried older women.
All married women I know of use "Mrs" - I know of none who use "Ms".
Come to think of it, the only woman - one only - I know who is married and
who does use "Ms" is a woman who didn't take her husband's name.
I have been married for 17 years now and I didn't take my husband's
name and use Ms. If you ever meet me, you'll know two.
And me makes three. We'll have to get together sometime. ;-)
Brian Harmer
2004-01-17 11:00:04 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 20:44:42 +1300, "Sue Bilstein"
Post by Sue Bilstein
Post by Tarla
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 16:25:12 +1300, Lennier
Post by Lennier
Come to think of it, the only woman - one only - I know who is married
and
Post by Tarla
Post by Lennier
who does use "Ms" is a woman who didn't take her husband's name.
I have been married for 17 years now and I didn't take my husband's
name and use Ms. If you ever meet me, you'll know two.
And me makes three. We'll have to get together sometime. ;-)
Gee you should be able to sell tickets to that meeting.
Brian Dooley
2004-01-18 04:57:03 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 15:37:50 +1300, Tarla
Post by Tarla
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 13:24:32 +1300, Lennier
Post by Lennier
Post by Tarla
As far as I am aware, it has never been a suitable term for men. They
already have a marriage neutral honorific: Mr.
Just as women have "Miss" men have "Master".
Just as women have "Mrs" men likewise have "Mr".
"Ms" is a term for a spinster. There is no equivalent for an older
unmarried man.
Master refers to an underaged male, not an unmarried one. Ms is a term
that is marriage neutral despite what you say.
Sheffield used to be full of 'little maisters', ie master
cutlers.
--
Brian Dooley

Wellington New Zealand
Karen Hayward-King
2004-01-14 20:53:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Most kids that I've heard being called that, have been males. But I
did know one female with that name.

--
Karen Hayward-King

"Everybody favors free speech in the slack moments
when no axes are being ground."

Heywood Broun
jerm
2004-01-14 21:57:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Try Delwyn. I first heard of it as a girl's name, then found it was a Welsh
man's name.

Names are what the parents say they are.
Steve B
2004-01-15 01:45:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by jerm
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Try Delwyn. I first heard of it as a girl's name, then found it was a Welsh
man's name.
Names are what the parents say they are.
Enda is a male Irish name that throws a lot of "foreigners".

And there is, I am solemnly assured by a reliable source, a man named
Endall Lust.

I once met a young woman called Dylan; but she did have a crew-cut.

Steve B.

(Not to be confused with Steve Chadwick or Stevie Smith).
Lawrence D'Oliveiro
2004-01-16 11:17:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve B
Enda is a male Irish name that throws a lot of "foreigners".
The principal of the girls' school across the road from the school I was
at was named Sister Enda.
Sue Bilstein
2004-01-17 00:11:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lawrence D'Oliveiro
Post by Steve B
Enda is a male Irish name that throws a lot of "foreigners".
The principal of the girls' school across the road from the school I was
at was named Sister Enda.
... But RC sisters often take the names of male saints.
Brian Harmer
2004-01-17 01:05:29 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 13:11:20 +1300, "Sue Bilstein"
Post by Sue Bilstein
Post by Lawrence D'Oliveiro
Post by Steve B
Enda is a male Irish name that throws a lot of "foreigners".
The principal of the girls' school across the road from the school I was
at was named Sister Enda.
... But RC sisters often take the names of male saints.
Indeed ... but in other cultures men often have feminine names as
well. Maria is often included as a second or third name in Europe, for
example.
Steve B
2004-01-17 01:21:21 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 14:05:29 +1300, Brian Harmer
Post by Brian Harmer
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 13:11:20 +1300, "Sue Bilstein"
Post by Sue Bilstein
Post by Lawrence D'Oliveiro
Post by Steve B
Enda is a male Irish name that throws a lot of "foreigners".
The principal of the girls' school across the road from the school I was
at was named Sister Enda.
... But RC sisters often take the names of male saints.
Indeed ... but in other cultures men often have feminine names as
well. Maria is often included as a second or third name in Europe, for
example.
My nephew took his second name from his godmother, Sister Mary James
(Sheila to her friends).

And I used to know a Peter Mary Nolan, who told me the practice is
quite common in Ireland. He's the only example I've encountered from
an "English speaking" country; but of course Jean-Maries and Jose
Marias are two a penny.

Steve B.
Tarla
2004-01-17 02:39:56 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 14:21:21 +1300, Steve B
Post by Steve B
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 14:05:29 +1300, Brian Harmer
Post by Brian Harmer
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 13:11:20 +1300, "Sue Bilstein"
Post by Sue Bilstein
Post by Lawrence D'Oliveiro
Post by Steve B
Enda is a male Irish name that throws a lot of "foreigners".
The principal of the girls' school across the road from the school I was
at was named Sister Enda.
... But RC sisters often take the names of male saints.
Indeed ... but in other cultures men often have feminine names as
well. Maria is often included as a second or third name in Europe, for
example.
My nephew took his second name from his godmother, Sister Mary James
(Sheila to her friends).
And I used to know a Peter Mary Nolan, who told me the practice is
quite common in Ireland. He's the only example I've encountered from
an "English speaking" country; but of course Jean-Maries and Jose
Marias are two a penny.
I went to HIgh school with a guy named Kimberly Lynn Kaput.
(pronounced Kay-put), he went by Kim.
Brian Dooley
2004-01-18 04:57:04 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 13:11:20 +1300, "Sue Bilstein"
Post by Steve B
Enda is a male Irish name that throws a lot of "foreigners".
And Aoife is a female Irish name that nobody knows how to
pronounce.

Come to think of it, hardly anybody knows how to pronounce most
Irish names.

As in Dubhlioich.
--
Brian Dooley

Wellington New Zealand
Newsman
2004-01-15 05:36:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by jerm
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Try Delwyn. I first heard of it as a girl's name, then found it was a Welsh
man's name.
Names are what the parents say they are.
Or the unfortunate outcome of parents not closely checking the efforts
of doubtless worthy, but dyslexic, registrars.

You end up with common miss-spellings such as Micheal (sic) and
Racheal (sic), and there are certainly plenty more like these.
Kerry
2004-01-15 07:26:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Newsman
Post by jerm
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Try Delwyn. I first heard of it as a girl's name, then found it was a Welsh
man's name.
Names are what the parents say they are.
Or the unfortunate outcome of parents not closely checking the efforts
of doubtless worthy, but dyslexic, registrars.
You end up with common miss-spellings such as Micheal (sic) and
Racheal (sic), and there are certainly plenty more like these.
It's much worse than that. Present as I am at the births of many many
babies, the stories I could tell you of the names. But I can't...

But you wouldn't believe!


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day;
Teach him to use the Net and he won't bother you for weeks.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sue Bilstein
2004-01-15 08:08:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerry
Post by Newsman
Or the unfortunate outcome of parents not closely checking the efforts
of doubtless worthy, but dyslexic, registrars.
You end up with common miss-spellings such as Micheal (sic) and
Racheal (sic), and there are certainly plenty more like these.
It's much worse than that. Present as I am at the births of many many
babies, the stories I could tell you of the names. But I can't...
But you wouldn't believe!
Lousie, for example (for Louise).
Tarla
2004-01-15 13:04:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerry
Post by Newsman
Post by jerm
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Try Delwyn. I first heard of it as a girl's name, then found it was a Welsh
man's name.
Names are what the parents say they are.
Or the unfortunate outcome of parents not closely checking the efforts
of doubtless worthy, but dyslexic, registrars.
You end up with common miss-spellings such as Micheal (sic) and
Racheal (sic), and there are certainly plenty more like these.
It's much worse than that. Present as I am at the births of many many
babies, the stories I could tell you of the names. But I can't...
But you wouldn't believe!
Okay, this is one of my all time favorite name stories. When I was at
Uni, one of my professors was from Arkansas. He said he grew up with
Hillbillys. He knew of two brothers that were named "Ucle Billy" and
"Mac's"...one of them was named after his UNCLE Billy, and the other
after the garage in town.
Col
2004-01-15 19:01:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
Post by Kerry
Post by Newsman
Post by jerm
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Try Delwyn. I first heard of it as a girl's name, then found it was a Welsh
man's name.
Names are what the parents say they are.
Or the unfortunate outcome of parents not closely checking the efforts
of doubtless worthy, but dyslexic, registrars.
You end up with common miss-spellings such as Micheal (sic) and
Racheal (sic), and there are certainly plenty more like these.
It's much worse than that. Present as I am at the births of many many
babies, the stories I could tell you of the names. But I can't...
But you wouldn't believe!
Okay, this is one of my all time favorite name stories. When I was at
Uni, one of my professors was from Arkansas. He said he grew up with
Hillbillys. He knew of two brothers that were named "Ucle Billy" and
"Mac's"...one of them was named after his UNCLE Billy, and the other
after the garage in town.
Years ago whilst talking to a Southerner in Florida he mentioned Bob Wah.. I
thought he was referring to a farmer when in fact he was talking about barbed
wire :)

--

Col

Dogs have masters. Cats have staff.
Lawrence D'Oliveiro
2004-01-16 11:16:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Col
Years ago whilst talking to a Southerner in Florida he mentioned Bob Wah.. I
thought he was referring to a farmer when in fact he was talking about barbed
wire :)
Would you go out with someone named Barb Dwyer...?
Steve B
2004-01-16 17:12:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Col
Years ago whilst talking to a Southerner in Florida he mentioned Bob Wah.. I
thought he was referring to a farmer when in fact he was talking about barbed
wire :)
Google on "Barb Dwyer"; there are quite a few of them.

Steve B.
jerm
2004-01-16 00:06:11 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 15 Jan 2004 07:26:43 GMT, ***@remove.this.bit.ihugconz (Kerry)
said
Post by Kerry
Post by Newsman
Post by jerm
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Try Delwyn. I first heard of it as a girl's name, then found it was a Welsh
man's name.
Names are what the parents say they are.
Or the unfortunate outcome of parents not closely checking the efforts
of doubtless worthy, but dyslexic, registrars.
You end up with common miss-spellings such as Micheal (sic) and
Racheal (sic), and there are certainly plenty more like these.
It's much worse than that. Present as I am at the births of many many
babies, the stories I could tell you of the names. But I can't...
But you wouldn't believe!
Yes, I would. teachers have to call them by those names when they arrive at
school.

Foreign names are tricky, though. Having a boy named Dung in your class
makes for a lot of hilarity, active intervention programmes, and whatever
before the kid decides his name is really Joe. But the parents still insist
he is Dung (after his grandfather).
Tarla
2004-01-15 13:05:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Newsman
Post by jerm
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Try Delwyn. I first heard of it as a girl's name, then found it was a Welsh
man's name.
Names are what the parents say they are.
Or the unfortunate outcome of parents not closely checking the efforts
of doubtless worthy, but dyslexic, registrars.
You end up with common miss-spellings such as Micheal (sic) and
Racheal (sic), and there are certainly plenty more like these.
My human name throws people off all the time. I blame the drugs my
mother was on when she signed my birth cert.
Bobs
2004-01-15 13:10:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
Post by Newsman
Post by jerm
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Try Delwyn. I first heard of it as a girl's name, then found it was a Welsh
man's name.
Names are what the parents say they are.
Or the unfortunate outcome of parents not closely checking the efforts
of doubtless worthy, but dyslexic, registrars.
You end up with common miss-spellings such as Micheal (sic) and
Racheal (sic), and there are certainly plenty more like these.
My human name throws people off all the time. I blame the drugs my
mother was on when she signed my birth cert.
I once met a guy with the first name of Tickleberry. At first I thought
he was making a sexual advance at me. No cretin asks me to tickle his
berries.
Tarla
2004-01-15 20:01:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bobs
I once met a guy with the first name of Tickleberry. At first I thought
he was making a sexual advance at me. No cretin asks me to tickle his
berries.
Did people call him Tickleberry, or did he at least have a decent
nickname? (What cruel parents!)
KiwiScribe
2004-01-16 02:44:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
Post by Bobs
I once met a guy with the first name of Tickleberry. At first I thought
he was making a sexual advance at me. No cretin asks me to tickle his
berries.
Did people call him Tickleberry, or did he at least have a decent
nickname? (What cruel parents!)
I went to school with a kid called Richard Head. Naturally everybody -
including his parents - called him Dick! Imagine calling him in for dinner
...
Tarla
2004-01-16 03:09:11 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 15:44:10 +1300, "KiwiScribe"
Post by KiwiScribe
Post by Tarla
Post by Bobs
I once met a guy with the first name of Tickleberry. At first I thought
he was making a sexual advance at me. No cretin asks me to tickle his
berries.
Did people call him Tickleberry, or did he at least have a decent
nickname? (What cruel parents!)
I went to school with a kid called Richard Head. Naturally everybody -
including his parents - called him Dick! Imagine calling him in for dinner
One Christmas when I was 16, we were having brunch at my paternal
grandmother's (our family tradition). Until that day, I didn't know
that my uncle's first name was John. We always called him Uncle Dick.
I asked him, "Why don't you use your first name?'
He replied, "Do you know what a john is?"
I said, "Do you know what a dick is?"

My father actually fell out of his chair laughing.
Lawrence D'Oliveiro
2004-01-16 11:15:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
One Christmas when I was 16, we were having brunch at my paternal
grandmother's (our family tradition). Until that day, I didn't know
that my uncle's first name was John. We always called him Uncle Dick.
I have an Uncle Dick. His wife's nickname is "Bill".
Peter Metcalfe
2004-01-16 03:34:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by KiwiScribe
I went to school with a kid called Richard Head.
I knew a Richard Seaman once.

--Peter Metcalfe
Geoff McCaughan
2004-01-16 04:26:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Metcalfe
Post by KiwiScribe
I went to school with a kid called Richard Head.
I knew a Richard Seaman once.
I once met a Donna Root.
SomebodyElse
2004-01-16 08:59:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by KiwiScribe
I went to school with a kid called Richard Head. Naturally everybody -
including his parents - called him Dick! Imagine calling him in for dinner
...
I worked with a Richard Small once ... he used to phone up & say "Hey,
Little Dick here..."
Bobs
2004-01-16 03:27:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
Post by Bobs
I once met a guy with the first name of Tickleberry. At first I thought
he was making a sexual advance at me. No cretin asks me to tickle his
berries.
Did people call him Tickleberry, or did he at least have a decent
nickname? (What cruel parents!)
I have no idea, it's not like we were friends. His name was Tickleberry
though. His parents must have been 60's hippies. Apparently there really
are people with names like Moonshine and Moonbeam. I pity the poor bastards.
Lawrence D'Oliveiro
2004-01-16 11:14:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bobs
Apparently there really
are people with names like Moonshine and Moonbeam. I pity the poor bastards.
Frank Zappa named his children "Dweezil" and "Moon Unit".
Steve B
2004-01-16 17:19:13 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 00:14:02 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
Post by Lawrence D'Oliveiro
Post by Bobs
Apparently there really
are people with names like Moonshine and Moonbeam. I pity the poor bastards.
Frank Zappa named his children "Dweezil" and "Moon Unit".
See my adjacent post.
Steve B
2004-01-16 17:18:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bobs
Post by Tarla
Post by Bobs
I once met a guy with the first name of Tickleberry. At first I thought
he was making a sexual advance at me. No cretin asks me to tickle his
berries.
Did people call him Tickleberry, or did he at least have a decent
nickname? (What cruel parents!)
I have no idea, it's not like we were friends. His name was Tickleberry
though. His parents must have been 60's hippies. Apparently there really
are people with names like Moonshine and Moonbeam. I pity the poor bastards.
I knew a guy named Shade; his sister had an equally "environmental"
name that I can't remember. He adopted his second name in his teens;
his sister, AFAIK stuck with hers.

It's probably eaiser for girls. After all Moon Unit Zappa seems merely
to have dropped the "Unit". OTOH, HER brother seems quite happy with
Dweezil.

Steve B.
Leon
2004-01-16 17:40:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bobs
Post by Tarla
Post by Bobs
I once met a guy with the first name of Tickleberry. At first I thought
he was making a sexual advance at me. No cretin asks me to tickle his
berries.
Did people call him Tickleberry, or did he at least have a decent
nickname? (What cruel parents!)
I have no idea, it's not like we were friends. His name was Tickleberry
though. His parents must have been 60's hippies. Apparently there really
are people with names like Moonshine and Moonbeam. I pity the poor bastards.
In South Africa it's common for the black people to give children what
Westerners would consider strange names.

I'm not shitting you when I say these are actual first names of Soccer
players who have played for the national team in the past couple of
years.

Doctor Khumalo
Innocent Buthelezi
Macbetch Sibaya
Zuma
Shakes Mashaba


And I have known a few black African woman with names like 'Patience',
'Precious', 'Beauty', and even 'Chance'...

Just my 2 cents...
Tarla
2004-01-16 19:58:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leon
In South Africa it's common for the black people to give children what
Westerners would consider strange names.
I'm not shitting you when I say these are actual first names of Soccer
players who have played for the national team in the past couple of
years.
Doctor Khumalo
Innocent Buthelezi
Macbetch Sibaya
Zuma
Shakes Mashaba
And I have known a few black African woman with names like 'Patience',
'Precious', 'Beauty', and even 'Chance'...
It's a fairly common practice among American blacks as well. I
remember a whole family of athletes named Mons. The kids were named
Wonderful, Incredible, etc.
Gordon
2004-01-16 08:36:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
My human name throws people off all the time. I blame the drugs my
mother was on when she signed my birth cert.
Thought about changing it?
--
Fairy stories exist so children get used to real life
Tarla
2004-01-16 11:42:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gordon
Post by Tarla
My human name throws people off all the time. I blame the drugs my
mother was on when she signed my birth cert.
Thought about changing it?
Nope. I like it. It's such a common name without the different
spelling. I have an extra letter at the end, as if she started
signing the cert and just couldn't stop. I'm lucky I don't have five
or six of the same letter at the end of my name ; )
Steve B
2004-01-16 17:22:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
Post by Gordon
Post by Tarla
My human name throws people off all the time. I blame the drugs my
mother was on when she signed my birth cert.
Thought about changing it?
Nope. I like it. It's such a common name without the different
spelling. I have an extra letter at the end, as if she started
signing the cert and just couldn't stop. I'm lucky I don't have five
or six of the same letter at the end of my name ; )
And to get back to the root of the thread, of the two reasonably
well-known people I've heard of who spelt it that way, one was male
and one female.

Steve B.
SomebodyElse
2004-01-17 09:29:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
My human name throws people off all the time.
You have a 'non-human' name.....???

- Scott
Tarla
2004-01-17 19:27:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by SomebodyElse
Post by Tarla
My human name throws people off all the time.
You have a 'non-human' name.....???
Tarla. It's my "net" name.
Tarla
****
Dammit, Jeb, I'm as Amish as the next guy, but if we
don't take out that sub, there won't be a Pennsylvania
to go home TO."

-my son,Eric
Enkidu
2004-01-14 22:44:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
The neighbours in "Married with Children" (later series) were called
Darcy. The wife ("spousal unit"?) was called Marcy Darcy after she
married her toy boy.

Cheers,

Cliff
--
Christmas comes but once a year, thank the gods. I don't think
that I could cope with twice.
harry
2004-01-14 23:02:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Mmmmmmm
Darcy Wretzsky from the Smashing Pumpkins is kind of girly
Jamez
2004-01-15 20:37:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Mmmmmmm
Darcy Wretzsky from the Smashing Pumpkins is kind of girly
Yes, very nicely girly. BTW she spells it D'Arcy. I assume its
pronounced 'darcy' as the alternative would be something like
'duh-arsey', which doesn't sound particularly hip for a successful
alternative muso.

For unusual names check out
http://www.notwithoutmyhandbag.com/babynames/index.html
Steve B
2004-01-16 17:31:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jamez
Post by harry
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Mmmmmmm
Darcy Wretzsky from the Smashing Pumpkins is kind of girly
Yes, very nicely girly. BTW she spells it D'Arcy. I assume its
pronounced 'darcy' as the alternative would be something like
'duh-arsey', which doesn't sound particularly hip for a successful
alternative muso.
For unusual names check out
http://www.notwithoutmyhandbag.com/babynames/index.html
" You already know the end - the immense drama of the Lord Jestocost,
seventh of his line, and how the catgirl C'mell initiated the vast
conspiracy. But you do not know the beginning, how the first Lord
Jestocost got his name, because of the terror and inspiration which
his mother, Lady Goroke, obtained from the famous real-life drama of
the dog-girl D'joan. It is even less likely that you know the other
story - the one behind D'joan..."
Cordwainer Smith.

Last time I referred to Smith's convention of using an apostrophised
iniitial letter to indicate an element of non-human genetics, David
McLoughlin said a woman called C'mell had taught his daughter.

Steve B.
Newsman
2004-01-16 20:49:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jamez
Post by harry
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Mmmmmmm
Darcy Wretzsky from the Smashing Pumpkins is kind of girly
Yes, very nicely girly. BTW she spells it D'Arcy. I assume its
pronounced 'darcy' as the alternative would be something like
'duh-arsey', which doesn't sound particularly hip for a successful
alternative muso.
While we're on about apostrophised or hyphenated names, what could be
dafter than Coc 'Kroft?

The woman doesn't like the sound of "cock" in her name so she's
produced this silly variant as if both to conceal it and to affect
some sort of class and exotic cachet.

But behind it all she's still a common-or-garden Kiwi TV bird with
that characteristic mid-pitch nasal whine and a mindless airhead
delivery to camera.

Which is what makes her contrived name all the more vapid and absurd.
Lennier
2004-01-17 00:33:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Newsman
But behind it all she's still a common-or-garden Kiwi TV bird with
that characteristic mid-pitch nasal whine and a mindless airhead
delivery to camera.
If you don't like the way NZers speak in our own country, then fuck off
back to your own country!

Savvy??


Lennier
--
The above reply is in response to a person who can be only described as a
knuckle-dragger.
Jamez
2004-01-17 19:45:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Newsman
Post by Jamez
Post by harry
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
Mmmmmmm
Darcy Wretzsky from the Smashing Pumpkins is kind of girly
Yes, very nicely girly. BTW she spells it D'Arcy. I assume its
pronounced 'darcy' as the alternative would be something like
'duh-arsey', which doesn't sound particularly hip for a successful
alternative muso.
While we're on about apostrophised or hyphenated names, what could be
dafter than Coc 'Kroft?
The woman doesn't like the sound of "cock" in her name so she's
produced this silly variant as if both to conceal it and to affect
some sort of class and exotic cachet.
But behind it all she's still a common-or-garden Kiwi TV bird with
that characteristic mid-pitch nasal whine and a mindless airhead
delivery to camera.
Agreed, IMO one of the more bland of the recent crop of tele-bimbos.
Brian Harmer
2004-01-17 19:52:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jamez
Post by Newsman
While we're on about apostrophised or hyphenated names, what could be
dafter than Coc 'Kroft?
The woman doesn't like the sound of "cock" in her name so she's
produced this silly variant as if both to conceal it and to affect
some sort of class and exotic cachet.
But behind it all she's still a common-or-garden Kiwi TV bird with
that characteristic mid-pitch nasal whine and a mindless airhead
delivery to camera.
Agreed, IMO one of the more bland of the recent crop of tele-bimbos.
Recent? She's been around for ever!
Jamez
2004-01-17 23:26:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Harmer
Post by Jamez
Post by Newsman
While we're on about apostrophised or hyphenated names, what could be
dafter than Coc 'Kroft?
The woman doesn't like the sound of "cock" in her name so she's
produced this silly variant as if both to conceal it and to affect
some sort of class and exotic cachet.
But behind it all she's still a common-or-garden Kiwi TV bird with
that characteristic mid-pitch nasal whine and a mindless airhead
delivery to camera.
Agreed, IMO one of the more bland of the recent crop of tele-bimbos.
Recent? She's been around for ever!
Touche. Sporadically on TV since 1991. How time flies :-)
Gib Bogle
2004-01-15 01:43:00 UTC
Permalink
These days many parents seem to think it cool to give their girls boys'
names. Also last name as a first name. It comes from California, I
believe.

Gib
Luthien
2004-01-15 08:42:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gib Bogle
These days many parents seem to think it cool to give their girls boys'
names. Also last name as a first name. It comes from California, I
believe.
Gib
I went to school (in NZ) with a girl named Kenzie McKenzie.
yuk:/
Translated this would mean:
Kenzie, son of Kenzie.
SomebodyElse
2004-01-16 08:55:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Luthien
Post by Gib Bogle
These days many parents seem to think it cool to give their girls boys'
names. Also last name as a first name. It comes from California, I
believe.
Gib
I went to school (in NZ) with a girl named Kenzie McKenzie.
yuk:/
Kenzie, son of Kenzie.
A couple of other funny names I've come across are
Donald McDonald
William Williams
& Robert Robertson (oh, and more than one Robbie Robertson too)

- Scott
Lennier
2004-01-17 00:18:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by SomebodyElse
A couple of other funny names I've come across are
Donald McDonald
Have you been up to northern Scotland recently?

Whole towns with people named "Donald MacDonald".

So much so that people use nicknames in order to know who they're talking
about.


Lennier
--
"When dealing with the Religious Right one should remember that 'truth'
is not a part of the rules of their game."
Brian Dooley
2004-01-18 04:57:05 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 13:18:15 +1300, Lennier
Post by Lennier
Post by SomebodyElse
A couple of other funny names I've come across are
Donald McDonald
Have you been up to northern Scotland recently?
Whole towns with people named "Donald MacDonald".
So much so that people use nicknames in order to know who they're talking
about.
When I was in the army in Germany I knew a Brian Alexander
MacDonald who came from Inverness.

Many years afterwards I met a woman from Inverness and asked if
she knew a Brian Alexander MacDonald.

She replied, "Which one?".
--
Brian Dooley

Wellington New Zealand
KiwiScribe
2004-01-15 02:42:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
It's a surname, originally of Norman derivation and spelled D'Arcy.

In 19th Century England, giving family names to children became fashionable,
thus Darcy evolved into a first name. Back then it was generally a male name
but like Evelyn and Tracy (both also originally male given names), Darcy is
now used for both sexes. In the US there is an interesting racial divide -
whites called Darcy are invariably female b ut it is a popular name for
African-American boys.
Tarla
2004-01-15 13:07:22 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 15 Jan 2004 15:42:27 +1300, "KiwiScribe"
Post by KiwiScribe
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
It's a surname, originally of Norman derivation and spelled D'Arcy.
In 19th Century England, giving family names to children became fashionable,
thus Darcy evolved into a first name. Back then it was generally a male name
but like Evelyn and Tracy (both also originally male given names), Darcy is
now used for both sexes. In the US there is an interesting racial divide -
whites called Darcy are invariably female b ut it is a popular name for
African-American boys.
Thanks for that. When the spousal unit came home from work the other
day, he mentioned a new employee named Darcy. "A female engineer? How
nice!," I said. Nope, it was a man. He was a little taken aback by it
as well, since we think of Darcy as a girls name...and yes, we're
white.
Lennier
2004-01-15 03:24:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
It's a Surname - Marcy Darcy - a character on the brilliant TV comedy
Married With Children.


Lennier
--
Newsman - on CD piracy: "Entertainment meets Geekery meets Vengeance. It's
unstoppable. A match made in Heaven."
jerm
2004-01-15 18:18:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lennier
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
It's a Surname - Marcy Darcy - a character on the brilliant TV comedy
Married With Children.
It's a comedy? Not the prequel to the Osbournes?

I'm shattered.
Col
2004-01-15 19:02:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by jerm
Post by Lennier
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
It's a Surname - Marcy Darcy - a character on the brilliant TV comedy
Married With Children.
It's a comedy? Not the prequel to the Osbournes?
I'm shattered.
D'Arcy is a surname .
--

Col

Dogs have masters. Cats have staff.
Lennier
2004-01-16 04:24:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by jerm
Post by Lennier
It's a Surname - Marcy Darcy - a character on the brilliant TV comedy
Married With Children.
It's a comedy? Not the prequel to the Osbournes?
I'm shattered.
What are the Osbournes?


Lennier

--
Brian Valentine - Microsoft's SVP for Windows development: "We
really haven't done everything we could to protect our customers. Our
products just aren't engineered for security."
jerm
2004-01-16 06:28:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lennier
Post by jerm
Post by Lennier
It's a Surname - Marcy Darcy - a character on the brilliant TV comedy
Married With Children.
It's a comedy? Not the prequel to the Osbournes?
I'm shattered.
What are the Osbournes?
Ah, the sweet innocence of youth . Tis better you never know.
Enkidu
2004-01-16 07:05:29 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 17:24:42 +1300, Lennier
Post by Lennier
Post by jerm
Post by Lennier
It's a Surname - Marcy Darcy - a character on the brilliant TV comedy
Married With Children.
It's a comedy? Not the prequel to the Osbournes?
I'm shattered.
What are the Osbournes?
Lennier, I refuse to believe that you have been living under a rock
for the last few years. Let me re-phrase that. Lennier, I hope that
you haven't been living under a rock for the last few years.

Cheers,

Cliff
--
Christmas comes but once a year, thank the gods. I don't think
that I could cope with twice.
Lennier
2004-01-16 07:52:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Enkidu
Post by Lennier
What are the Osbournes?
Lennier, I refuse to believe that you have been living under a rock
for the last few years. Let me re-phrase that. Lennier, I hope that
you haven't been living under a rock for the last few years.
What are the Osbournes?

I don't watch much TV - it's mostly junk and tends to distract from pla...
err... using my computer.

There have been some exceptions - one of them is Babylon 5 another is
Married with Children. Another is - or rather was - the Weather report
first thing in the morning - stunning presenter he was!


Lennier
--
Delenn: "Do not look any further. All life is transitory - a dream.
We all come together in cyber space, in the end of time. If I do not
see you, I'll see you again soon - at the place where no Shadows fall."
Nicolaas Hawkins
2004-01-16 09:17:41 UTC
Permalink
In Message <news:***@TRACKER>
dated Fri, 16 Jan 2004 20:52:00 +1300,
Post by Lennier
Post by Enkidu
Post by Lennier
What are the Osbournes?
Lennier, I refuse to believe that you have been living under a rock
for the last few years. Let me re-phrase that. Lennier, I hope that
you haven't been living under a rock for the last few years.
What are the Osbournes?
I don't watch much TV - it's mostly junk and tends to distract from pla...
err... using my computer.
There have been some exceptions - one of them is Babylon 5 another is
Married with Children. Another is - or rather was - the Weather report
first thing in the morning - stunning presenter he was!
Interesting comment, coming from a Gay man.
--
Regards,
Nicolaas.



- Not all men are fools: some of us are single by choice, not by chance!
Steve B
2004-01-16 17:45:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Enkidu
On Fri, 16 Jan 2004 17:24:42 +1300, Lennier
Post by Lennier
Post by jerm
Post by Lennier
It's a Surname - Marcy Darcy - a character on the brilliant TV comedy
Married With Children.
It's a comedy? Not the prequel to the Osbournes?
I'm shattered.
What are the Osbournes?
Lennier, I refuse to believe that you have been living under a rock
for the last few years. Let me re-phrase that. Lennier, I hope that
you haven't been living under a rock for the last few years.
But all you have, I suspect, is the answer to the query "WHO are the
Osbournes?"

"What are the Osbournes?" is a different question.

Ozzy Osbourne is a (by his own admission) drug-addled former musician
(from a band called Black Sabbath); he, wife Sharon, son Jack and
daughter Kelly have made a "reality" TV show of their home life.

(that began to sound like the Jetsons, and perhaps the "space" link is
appropriate)

One of the (many) things my daughters both love, but I mostly can't
see the point of.

And BTW, Ozzy's real name is the unremarkable John Michael.

Steve B.
Lennier
2004-01-17 00:31:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve B
Ozzy Osbourne is a (by his own admission) drug-addled former musician
(from a band called Black Sabbath); he, wife Sharon, son Jack and
daughter Kelly have made a "reality" TV show of their home life.
Australian programme by any chance?


Lennier

--
"When dealing with the Religious Right one should remember that 'truth'
is not a part of the rules of their game."
Tarla
2004-01-17 02:41:51 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 13:31:41 +1300, Lennier
Post by Lennier
Post by Steve B
Ozzy Osbourne is a (by his own admission) drug-addled former musician
(from a band called Black Sabbath); he, wife Sharon, son Jack and
daughter Kelly have made a "reality" TV show of their home life.
Australian programme by any chance?
No, it's from your favorite country...the US. Even though Osborne is a
Brit.
Steve B
2004-01-16 17:36:10 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 15 Jan 2004 16:24:15 +1300, Lennier
Post by Lennier
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
It's a Surname - Marcy Darcy - a character on the brilliant TV comedy
Married With Children.
Lennier
For another famous rhyming Marcy, see: www.cwm.com/bio-carsey.html

Carsey-Werner appears as a production-company credit on a number of
US-sourced TV shows; now, the site tells me, Carsey-Werner-Mandabach.

Steve B.
Steve B
2004-01-16 19:53:46 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 06:36:10 +1300, Steve B
Post by Steve B
On Thu, 15 Jan 2004 16:24:15 +1300, Lennier
Post by Lennier
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
It's a Surname - Marcy Darcy - a character on the brilliant TV comedy
Married With Children.
Lennier
For another famous rhyming Marcy, see: www.cwm.com/bio-carsey.html
Carsey-Werner appears as a production-company credit on a number of
US-sourced TV shows; now, the site tells me, Carsey-Werner-Mandabach.
Then (to divert the thread slightly) there was Baz and Shaz. (Barry
and Sharon) a couple who appeared in a number of short comedy sketches
on a local TV show, always sitting in their car and perpetually
discussing their relationship and ever-pending wedding. When they
finally made it, we learned the full horrible truth.
"Repeat after me: ' I, Sharon Karen McLaren...'

I forget whether Baz had an equally embarrassing full name.

Steve B.
Lennier
2004-01-17 00:28:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve B
Then (to divert the thread slightly) there was Baz and Shaz. (Barry
and Sharon) a couple who appeared in a number of short comedy sketches
on a local TV show, always sitting in their car and perpetually
discussing their relationship and ever-pending wedding. When they
finally made it, we learned the full horrible truth.
"Repeat after me: ' I, Sharon Karen McLaren...'
ROTFLOL!


Lennier

--
"When dealing with the Religious Right one should remember that 'truth'
is not a part of the rules of their game."
pour-lay
2004-01-15 07:47:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
We it aint as 'gay' as Orlando.
Lennier
2004-01-15 08:02:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by pour-lay
We it aint as 'gay' as Orlando.
What's "gay" about "Orlando"? - it's a perfectly good Italian name.

Ever heard of Orlando Gibbons?


Lennier

--
"It is a joy to labor for those you love."
Sue Bilstein
2004-01-15 08:06:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by pour-lay
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
We it aint as 'gay' as Orlando.
Anyone remember Orlando the Marmalade Cat?
Steve B
2004-01-15 15:44:08 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 15 Jan 2004 21:06:57 +1300, "Sue Bilstein"
Post by Sue Bilstein
Post by pour-lay
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
We it aint as 'gay' as Orlando.
Anyone remember Orlando the Marmalade Cat?
..and his Dear Wife Grace.
One of the children's classics I never encountered as a child, but my
wife was brought up on them (and Winnie the Pooh, which I also
missed); so I had the pleasure of encountering them for the first
time, and handing them on to the next generation, in my 30s.

Steve B.
Sue Bilstein
2004-01-16 00:48:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve B
On Thu, 15 Jan 2004 21:06:57 +1300, "Sue Bilstein"
Post by Sue Bilstein
Post by pour-lay
Post by Tarla
"Darcy"
We it aint as 'gay' as Orlando.
Anyone remember Orlando the Marmalade Cat?
..and his Dear Wife Grace.
One of the children's classics I never encountered as a child, but my
wife was brought up on them (and Winnie the Pooh, which I also
missed); so I had the pleasure of encountering them for the first
time, and handing them on to the next generation, in my 30s.
And the kittens! Lovely pictures.
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