Discussion:
Short sighted
(too old to reply)
Tony
2020-12-15 22:21:29 UTC
Permalink
https://www.newsroom.co.nz/dare-to-be-wise
That's OK, who cares about classical education?
Incredibly short sighted, they will get rid of English literature next, after
all it has no practical value does it?
Philistines.
John Bowes
2020-12-16 01:08:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
https://www.newsroom.co.nz/dare-to-be-wise
That's OK, who cares about classical education?
Incredibly short sighted, they will get rid of English literature next, after
all it has no practical value does it?
Philistines.
No doubt they'll be replaced by a study of the benefits of Marxism and the communist manifesto......
James Christophers
2020-12-16 23:13:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
https://www.newsroom.co.nz/dare-to-be-wise
That's OK, who cares about classical education?
Incredibly short sighted, they will get rid of English literature next, after
all it has no practical value does it?
I think it's fair to say that practicality and pragmatism are the bywords of Nw Zealand's (supposedly)"classless" way of doing and thinking - apropos of which:

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/160691/can-your-use-of-latin-derived-words-indicate-your-social-class

"There you have it - did I hear more than one sharp intake of breath coming over the fibre...?

"In English-speaking societies coincidences of social and linguistic history have combined to create a lexical situation that is unique among languages: most of the specialist and high status terminology of English is Greco-Latin in origin and most of the less abrstract terminology is Anglo-Saxon in origin. English in this respect, relative to other languages, has a fairly clear boundary drawn between its everyday and its high status vocabularies. The bar is partly a function of the historically introduced and social class-based orderings of society that are associated with the division of labour: it separates the lexes of the members of conservative peripheral social groups from the dominant and high status lexicon of the language." - David Corson during the 1980's. (ibid)

The rest of the piece repays the effort of that one mouse-click ...
Post by Tony
Philistines.
Appropriated from the arabic 'falastinioum', suggesting outsiders so irredeemably unlearned and unsocialised as to be unfit for inclusion in polite society. A social class-marker if ever there were one, but these days considered a mark of the bourgeois wannabe.
Tony
2020-12-17 02:14:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Christophers
Post by Tony
https://www.newsroom.co.nz/dare-to-be-wise
That's OK, who cares about classical education?
Incredibly short sighted, they will get rid of English literature next, after
all it has no practical value does it?
I think it's fair to say that practicality and pragmatism are the bywords of
Nw Zealand's (supposedly)"classless" way of doing and thinking - apropos of
https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/160691/can-your-use-of-latin-derived-words-indicate-your-social-class
"There you have it - did I hear more than one sharp intake of breath coming
over the fibre...?
Not from me. Nobody in this newsgroup knows what the social class of others is
(assuming it actually matters a damn). Anybody who thinks they do is at best
guessing.
Post by James Christophers
"In English-speaking societies coincidences of social and linguistic history
most of the specialist and high status terminology of English is Greco-Latin in
origin and most of the less abrstract terminology is Anglo-Saxon in origin.
English in this respect, relative to other languages, has a fairly clear
boundary drawn between its everyday and its high status vocabularies. The bar
is partly a function of the historically introduced and social class-based
orderings of society that are associated with the division of labour: it
separates the lexes of the members of conservative peripheral social groups
from the dominant and high status lexicon of the language." - David Corson
during the 1980's. (ibid)
The rest of the piece repays the effort of that one mouse-click ...
Post by Tony
Philistines.
Appropriated from the arabic 'falastinioum', suggesting outsiders so
irredeemably unlearned and unsocialised as to be unfit for inclusion in polite
society. A social class-marker if ever there were one, but these days
considered a mark of the bourgeois wannabe.
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