Discussion:
Screentime rejects calls to end Police Ten
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James Christophers
2021-03-27 21:42:01 UTC
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Screentime has a point. Police Ten is a prime-time TV2 show that has been running since 2002. Pretty safe, then, to assume that it's a top money-spinner for Screentime.

I'd also have thought that for TVNZ, any call for Police Ten to be cancelled will meet with a similar response, and for the same commercial reasons.

The controversy: "Auckland Councillor Efeso Collins has hit out at the show, saying it depicts Māori and Pacific men as "brutish".

"He says a recent promo for the show, which has run for 28 seasons, was edited to prominently show "young brown people" and he wants it canned."

tinyurl.com/v43m3he4

Query: Since Police Ten's first transmission in 2002, what reduction in crimes committed by "young brown people" (depicted) as "brutish" has been achieved that is shown to be directly attributable to the programme?
Rich80105
2021-03-27 23:50:04 UTC
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On Sat, 27 Mar 2021 14:42:01 -0700 (PDT), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Screentime has a point. Police Ten is a prime-time TV2 show that has been running since 2002. Pretty safe, then, to assume that it's a top money-spinner for Screentime.
For which they rely on money from TV2. TV2 in turn will be seeking
audience numbers to justify income from commercial advertisements
Post by James Christophers
I'd also have thought that for TVNZ, any call for Police Ten to be cancelled will meet with a similar response, and for the same commercial reasons.
Unless of course 'the market' persuades television advertisers that
they do not wish to be associated with the programme. It worked for
offensive behaviour from a few radio 'personalities' . . .
Post by James Christophers
The controversy: "Auckland Councillor Efeso Collins has hit out at the show, saying it depicts M?ori and Pacific men as "brutish".
"He says a recent promo for the show, which has run for 28 seasons, was edited to prominently show "young brown people" and he wants it canned."
tinyurl.com/v43m3he4
Thanks you for the link - it is worth reading it all.
Post by James Christophers
Query: Since Police Ten's first transmission in 2002, what reduction in crimes committed by "young brown people" (depicted) as "brutish" has been achieved that is shown to be directly attributable to the programme?
I doubt such an aim has been part of the intent of either Screentime
or TVNZ - it is I suggest solely for the prurient viewing public to
gratify and perhaps reinforce their prejudices and to experience a
momentary thrill. For the poilice, it probably shows some of the more
difficult and physical aspects of policing, but does not necessarily
help in recruiting the sort of people they may be looking for.

The insidious effect however may well be an increase in racism, and
tolerance of racism. As a country we cannot aford to waste talent
through unfair prejudices; or through inequality of opportunity
arising from social and cultural prejudices.
James Christophers
2021-03-28 00:58:02 UTC
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Post by Rich80105
On Sat, 27 Mar 2021 14:42:01 -0700 (PDT), James Christophers
Screentime has a point. Police Ten is a prime-time TV2 show that has been running since 2002. Pretty safe, then, to assume that it's a top money-spinner for Screentime.
For which they rely on money from TV2. TV2 in turn will be seeking
audience numbers to justify income from commercial advertisements
I'd also have thought that for TVNZ, any call for Police Ten to be cancelled will meet with a similar response, and for the same commercial reasons.
Unless of course 'the market' persuades television advertisers that
they do not wish to be associated with the programme. It worked for
offensive behaviour from a few radio 'personalities' . . .
In this case, doubtful, since the overarching Banjay Group will be calling the shots, not TVNZ. In any case, the chronic slumpgut lowest-common-denominator who reality TV is aimed at is hardly likely to disavow the very thing that keeps their vacant stare locked on that screen as, night after night, Police Ten after Police Ten, they pile on the lard and the gross overloading of our health service that comes with it.
Post by Rich80105
The controversy: "Auckland Councillor Efeso Collins has hit out at the show, saying it depicts M?ori and Pacific men as "brutish".
"He says a recent promo for the show, which has run for 28 seasons, was edited to prominently show "young brown people" and he wants it canned."
tinyurl.com/v43m3he4
Thank you for the link - it is worth reading it all.
Query: Since Police Ten's first transmission in 2002, what reduction in crimes committed by "young brown people" (depicted) as "brutish" has been achieved that is shown to be directly attributable to the programme?
I doubt such an aim has been part of the intent of either Screentime
or TVNZ - it is I suggest solely for the prurient viewing public to
gratify and perhaps reinforce their prejudices and to experience a
momentary thrill.
Vicarious it is and vicarious it shall always be. If New Zealand's so-called "reality TV" - local or bought-in - is anything to go by, vicariousness surpasses all else in the nation's tastelessness stakes by a country mile.
Post by Rich80105
For the poilice, it probably shows some of the more
difficult and physical aspects of policing, but does not necessarily
help in recruiting the sort of people they may be looking for.
One cannot be too sure. It has often been posited that cop and criminal are essentially one and the same, the only difference being that each has chosen a different career path. Cop or crim, there's a certain only-to-well-known category of Kiwi who's always up for a bit of recreational biffo wherever and whenever it's up for grabs.
Post by Rich80105
The insidious effect however may well be an increase in racism, and
tolerance of racism.
Let's just say that Police Ten as depicted by Efeso Collins - i.e. selectively battening on the brown guy while **deliberately** and simultaneously titilliating the red-neck brigade - is unlikely to lessen, or lead to a greater understanding of, racism, hence promoting improved inter-racial and inter-cultural harmony and understanding.

In this regard, I doubt that the grubbers of Hobson Street give one solitary thought to the insidious negatives of their unedifying programming policy.
Rich80105
2021-03-28 08:33:33 UTC
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On Sat, 27 Mar 2021 17:58:02 -0700 (PDT), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Post by Rich80105
On Sat, 27 Mar 2021 14:42:01 -0700 (PDT), James Christophers
Screentime has a point. Police Ten is a prime-time TV2 show that has been running since 2002. Pretty safe, then, to assume that it's a top money-spinner for Screentime.
For which they rely on money from TV2. TV2 in turn will be seeking
audience numbers to justify income from commercial advertisements
I'd also have thought that for TVNZ, any call for Police Ten to be cancelled will meet with a similar response, and for the same commercial reasons.
Unless of course 'the market' persuades television advertisers that
they do not wish to be associated with the programme. It worked for
offensive behaviour from a few radio 'personalities' . . .
In this case, doubtful, since the overarching Banjay Group will be calling the shots, not TVNZ.
I saw advertising revenue to TVNZ being stopped by advertisers as
giving a possible reason why TVNZ may wish to stop a programme - and
even if a contract with the programme maker forces them to accept
episodes for some time TVNZ should be able to insist that there be
some leavening of the worst of the encouragement of bigotry and
prejudice.
Post by James Christophers
In any case, the chronic slumpgut lowest-common-denominator who reality TV is aimed at is hardly likely to disavow the very thing that keeps their vacant stare locked on that screen as, night after night, Police Ten after Police Ten, they pile on the lard and the gross overloading of our health service that comes with it.
Post by Rich80105
The controversy: "Auckland Councillor Efeso Collins has hit out at the show, saying it depicts M?ori and Pacific men as "brutish".
"He says a recent promo for the show, which has run for 28 seasons, was edited to prominently show "young brown people" and he wants it canned."
tinyurl.com/v43m3he4
Thank you for the link - it is worth reading it all.
Query: Since Police Ten's first transmission in 2002, what reduction in crimes committed by "young brown people" (depicted) as "brutish" has been achieved that is shown to be directly attributable to the programme?
I doubt such an aim has been part of the intent of either Screentime
or TVNZ - it is I suggest solely for the prurient viewing public to
gratify and perhaps reinforce their prejudices and to experience a
momentary thrill.
Vicarious it is and vicarious it shall always be. If New Zealand's so-called "reality TV" - local or bought-in - is anything to go by, vicariousness surpasses all else in the nation's tastelessness stakes by a country mile.
Post by Rich80105
For the poilice, it probably shows some of the more
difficult and physical aspects of policing, but does not necessarily
help in recruiting the sort of people they may be looking for.
One cannot be too sure. It has often been posited that cop and criminal are essentially one and the same, the only difference being that each has chosen a different career path. Cop or crim, there's a certain only-to-well-known category of Kiwi who's always up for a bit of recreational biffo wherever and whenever it's up for grabs.
Post by Rich80105
The insidious effect however may well be an increase in racism, and
tolerance of racism.
Let's just say that Police Ten as depicted by Efeso Collins - i.e. selectively battening on the brown guy while **deliberately** and simultaneously titilliating the red-neck brigade - is unlikely to lessen, or lead to a greater understanding of, racism, hence promoting improved inter-racial and inter-cultural harmony and understanding.
In this regard, I doubt that the grubbers of Hobson Street give one solitary thought to the insidious negatives of their unedifying programming policy.
Willy Nilly
2021-03-29 05:02:05 UTC
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Query: Since Police Ten's first transmission in 2002, what reduction in cr=
imes committed by "young brown people" (depicted) as "brutish" has been ach=
ieved that is shown to be directly attributable to the programme?
That's easy: those criminals who were dobbed in by viewers, committed
no crimes while consequently in prison. You can do the maths.

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