Discussion:
Get me the tissues, i'm about to cry
(too old to reply)
Mr Scebe
2005-01-09 05:09:43 UTC
Permalink
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=9006008

"Emma White's mum and dad disembarked a boat from Britain with only a bed
and a wringer washing machine, and within a year they had bought their first
home. A generation later, Ms White and her fiance, Andrew McDowall, both
from Auckland, can't afford even a small slice of the Kiwi pavlova paradise.
They are the face of a crisis that has put first homes beyond the reach of
even relatively well-off young families, let alone those on low incomes and
benefits."

For fuck's sake, get me a tissue. So they can't afford a house, so (Wobbler)
Cullen's going to hand out the Christmas presents before the election, just
so these fucking dimbulb's can get on the debt bandwagon!

The only problem is, by helping out the govt will cause the exact opposite
effect, which is to increase house price inflation, thereby making it even
more unaffordable for the next generation to get into housing.

And why the fucking obsession with it anyway? I am quite happy to live in a
rented house, while my landlord subsidises the shit out of my rent - to the
tune of $130 a week. The problem is that the baby boomers have driven the
price of housing up all around the world, through the demand created by
their greater numbers. This will only be a problem for another couple of
years, by which time the (lack of) housing demand will create a deflationary
environment that will make the 90/91 crash look like a boom.
--
Mr Scebe
Losersh always whine about their 'besht'.
Winnersh go home and fuck the prom queen".
~Sean Connery in "The Rock"
Bobs
2005-01-09 05:19:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mr Scebe
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=9006008
"Emma White's mum and dad disembarked a boat from Britain with only a bed
and a wringer washing machine, and within a year they had bought their first
home. A generation later, Ms White and her fiance, Andrew McDowall, both
from Auckland, can't afford even a small slice of the Kiwi pavlova paradise.
They are the face of a crisis that has put first homes beyond the reach of
even relatively well-off young families, let alone those on low incomes and
benefits."
For fuck's sake, get me a tissue. So they can't afford a house, so (Wobbler)
Cullen's going to hand out the Christmas presents before the election, just
so these fucking dimbulb's can get on the debt bandwagon!
The only problem is, by helping out the govt will cause the exact opposite
effect, which is to increase house price inflation, thereby making it even
more unaffordable for the next generation to get into housing.
And why the fucking obsession with it anyway? I am quite happy to live in a
rented house, while my landlord subsidises the shit out of my rent - to the
tune of $130 a week. The problem is that the baby boomers have driven the
price of housing up all around the world, through the demand created by
their greater numbers. This will only be a problem for another couple of
years, by which time the (lack of) housing demand will create a deflationary
environment that will make the 90/91 crash look like a boom.
Rent is wasted income, Scabs. You may as well buy a house with a
mortgage and pay that off instead. At least that way your weekly income
goes towards your asset, and not someone elses asset.

This is why I will be a billionaire by 30, and you will be a washed up
poof selling yourself to Chinese tourists for an ounce of H.
Gordon
2005-01-09 05:35:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bobs
Rent is wasted income, Scabs. You may as well buy a house with a
mortgage and pay that off instead. At least that way your weekly income
goes towards your asset, and not someone elses asset.
By your viewpoint.
Bobs
2005-01-09 05:41:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gordon
Post by Bobs
Rent is wasted income, Scabs. You may as well buy a house with a
mortgage and pay that off instead. At least that way your weekly income
goes towards your asset, and not someone elses asset.
By your viewpoint.
Well, not really. Property is always a good investment as long as you
aren't stupid and buy an apartment in the city. Particually in a place
such as Auckland, where rents range from high to obscene. Makes no sense
to me to be paying $150/week in rent for any long period of time. Why
pay money to make someone else rich?

Of course, if everyone thought like me then house prices would be even
higher, so I encourage the peasants to waste their money on rent.
Allistar
2005-01-09 10:42:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bobs
Post by Mr Scebe
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=9006008
"Emma White's mum and dad disembarked a boat from Britain with only a bed
and a wringer washing machine, and within a year they had bought their
first home. A generation later, Ms White and her fiance, Andrew McDowall,
both from Auckland, can't afford even a small slice of the Kiwi pavlova
paradise. They are the face of a crisis that has put first homes beyond
the reach of even relatively well-off young families, let alone those on
low incomes and benefits."
For fuck's sake, get me a tissue. So they can't afford a house, so
(Wobbler) Cullen's going to hand out the Christmas presents before the
election, just so these fucking dimbulb's can get on the debt bandwagon!
The only problem is, by helping out the govt will cause the exact
opposite effect, which is to increase house price inflation, thereby
making it even more unaffordable for the next generation to get into
housing.
And why the fucking obsession with it anyway? I am quite happy to live in
a rented house, while my landlord subsidises the shit out of my rent - to
the tune of $130 a week. The problem is that the baby boomers have driven
the price of housing up all around the world, through the demand created
by their greater numbers. This will only be a problem for another couple
of years, by which time the (lack of) housing demand will create a
deflationary environment that will make the 90/91 crash look like a boom.
Rent is wasted income, Scabs. You may as well buy a house with a
mortgage and pay that off instead. At least that way your weekly income
goes towards your asset, and not someone elses asset.
Rent can be about trading money for lifestyle - living in a house you could
no where near afford to buy in a good area by good schools. So the rent may
be higher, but at least it's feasible. In the meantime buy a house for
someone else to rent in an area you don't want to live in.

Allistar.
Tarla
2005-01-09 05:25:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mr Scebe
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=9006008
"Emma White's mum and dad disembarked a boat from Britain with only a bed
and a wringer washing machine, and within a year they had bought their first
home. A generation later, Ms White and her fiance, Andrew McDowall, both
from Auckland, can't afford even a small slice of the Kiwi pavlova paradise.
They are the face of a crisis that has put first homes beyond the reach of
even relatively well-off young families, let alone those on low incomes and
benefits."
Wonder how 'relatively well-off' they're talking about. It only took
us four years to save enough to buy a house and we exhausted all of
our savings paying both rent here and mortgage on our house in the
States until we could sell it...8 months after we arrived. Perhaps
they don't save well, or perhaps they really aren't relatively
well-off.

I don't see why people on the benefit should be able to afford to buy
a house with my tax money. You want to buy a house, get off the dole.
Post by Mr Scebe
For fuck's sake, get me a tissue. So they can't afford a house, so (Wobbler)
Cullen's going to hand out the Christmas presents before the election, just
so these fucking dimbulb's can get on the debt bandwagon!
The only problem is, by helping out the govt will cause the exact opposite
effect, which is to increase house price inflation, thereby making it even
more unaffordable for the next generation to get into housing.
And why the fucking obsession with it anyway? I am quite happy to live in a
rented house, while my landlord subsidises the shit out of my rent - to the
tune of $130 a week. The problem is that the baby boomers have driven the
price of housing up all around the world, through the demand created by
their greater numbers. This will only be a problem for another couple of
years, by which time the (lack of) housing demand will create a deflationary
environment that will make the 90/91 crash look like a boom.
another couple of years? Boomers range in age from 61 to 41 years of
age. They aren't going to start dropping off in any great numbers for
another 15 years.
Sue Bilstein
2005-01-09 05:55:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
Post by Mr Scebe
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=9006008
"Emma White's mum and dad disembarked a boat from Britain with only a bed
and a wringer washing machine, and within a year they had bought their first
home. A generation later, Ms White and her fiance, Andrew McDowall, both
from Auckland, can't afford even a small slice of the Kiwi pavlova paradise.
They are the face of a crisis that has put first homes beyond the reach of
even relatively well-off young families, let alone those on low incomes and
benefits."
Wonder how 'relatively well-off' they're talking about. It only took
us four years to save enough to buy a house and we exhausted all of
our savings paying both rent here and mortgage on our house in the
States until we could sell it...8 months after we arrived. Perhaps
they don't save well, or perhaps they really aren't relatively
well-off.
Combined income of $90,000. But their priorities are screwed:

"For Ms White, 27, and Mr McDowall, 26, the prospect is daunting. They
are trying to save $20,000 for their December wedding, and $20,000 for
a deposit on a house. So far, they have put away about $10,000."

WTF $20,000 for a wedding? $1,000 tops for a bang-up party at home
with friends.
Post by Tarla
I don't see why people on the benefit should be able to afford to buy
a house with my tax money. You want to buy a house, get off the dole.
Bobs
2005-01-09 05:58:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sue Bilstein
Post by Tarla
Post by Mr Scebe
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=9006008
"Emma White's mum and dad disembarked a boat from Britain with only a bed
and a wringer washing machine, and within a year they had bought their first
home. A generation later, Ms White and her fiance, Andrew McDowall, both
from Auckland, can't afford even a small slice of the Kiwi pavlova paradise.
They are the face of a crisis that has put first homes beyond the reach of
even relatively well-off young families, let alone those on low incomes and
benefits."
Wonder how 'relatively well-off' they're talking about. It only took
us four years to save enough to buy a house and we exhausted all of
our savings paying both rent here and mortgage on our house in the
States until we could sell it...8 months after we arrived. Perhaps
they don't save well, or perhaps they really aren't relatively
well-off.
What the hell are they wasting their money on if they earn $90k between
them? And they can't even save a miserable $20k for a deposit. Useless.
Post by Sue Bilstein
"For Ms White, 27, and Mr McDowall, 26, the prospect is daunting. They
are trying to save $20,000 for their December wedding, and $20,000 for
a deposit on a house. So far, they have put away about $10,000."
WTF $20,000 for a wedding? $1,000 tops for a bang-up party at home
with friends.
Post by Tarla
I don't see why people on the benefit should be able to afford to buy
a house with my tax money. You want to buy a house, get off the dole.
A L P
2005-01-09 07:55:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sue Bilstein
"For Ms White, 27, and Mr McDowall, 26, the prospect is daunting. They
are trying to save $20,000 for their December wedding, and $20,000 for
a deposit on a house. So far, they have put away about $10,000."
WTF $20,000 for a wedding? $1,000 tops for a bang-up party at home
with friends.
Ye gods! Talk about useless! Those people couldn't organise a pissup
in a brewery. Saved $10,000 - over how long, I wonder? And whining now
because they can't afford a house, when their feeble savings efforts
aren't even dedicated towards that end. Jeez, when you're trying to get
a deposit together you SAVE, you make your own sandwiches for lunch, you
live like a goddamn pauper because the longer it takes you. the longer
you're shelling out rent and the higher house prices will have risen.

I think I'm having an unsympathetic moment.

A L P
Allistar
2005-01-09 10:40:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sue Bilstein
Post by Tarla
Post by Mr Scebe
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=9006008
"Emma White's mum and dad disembarked a boat from Britain with only a bed
and a wringer washing machine, and within a year they had bought their
first home. A generation later, Ms White and her fiance, Andrew McDowall,
both from Auckland, can't afford even a small slice of the Kiwi pavlova
paradise. They are the face of a crisis that has put first homes beyond
the reach of even relatively well-off young families, let alone those on
low incomes and benefits."
Wonder how 'relatively well-off' they're talking about. It only took
us four years to save enough to buy a house and we exhausted all of
our savings paying both rent here and mortgage on our house in the
States until we could sell it...8 months after we arrived. Perhaps
they don't save well, or perhaps they really aren't relatively
well-off.
"For Ms White, 27, and Mr McDowall, 26, the prospect is daunting. They
are trying to save $20,000 for their December wedding, and $20,000 for
a deposit on a house. So far, they have put away about $10,000."
20G for a wedding? Crikey dick. It seems that a flash wedding is more
important than a house. So be it, but it's their choice.
Post by Sue Bilstein
WTF $20,000 for a wedding? $1,000 tops for a bang-up party at home
with friends.
Indeed.

Allistar.
Ashley
2005-01-09 18:37:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Allistar
20G for a wedding? Crikey dick. It seems that a flash wedding is more
important than a house. So be it, but it's their choice.
$20K would not be a *flash* wedding. It would be a normal, run-of-the mill
wedding. Remember, this includes feeding probably 50-100 people and a
honeymoon, as well as the dress, car hire, venue hire etc.
Post by Allistar
Post by Sue Bilstein
WTF $20,000 for a wedding? $1,000 tops for a bang-up party at home
with friends.
Indeed.
That may be your choice. But a wedding is a very significant rite of passage
and celebration. Personally, I think this society has lost far too much
ceremony and celebration of important lifetime events. If they are budgeting
$20K, they're not being extravagant at all, and I say more power to them for
prioritising an extremely important event in their life and including their
friends and family.

A bang-up party for 100 people at home would cost you a couple of grand for
the alcohol, at least. Just multiply 100 x $20. You guys either have few
people you would want to celebrate with, have no clue of costs, or would
expect everyone to bring a bottle to your wedding.
Tarla
2005-01-09 18:01:45 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 09 Jan 2005 18:55:42 +1300, Sue Bilstein
Post by Sue Bilstein
Post by Tarla
Post by Mr Scebe
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=9006008
"Emma White's mum and dad disembarked a boat from Britain with only a bed
and a wringer washing machine, and within a year they had bought their first
home. A generation later, Ms White and her fiance, Andrew McDowall, both
from Auckland, can't afford even a small slice of the Kiwi pavlova paradise.
They are the face of a crisis that has put first homes beyond the reach of
even relatively well-off young families, let alone those on low incomes and
benefits."
Wonder how 'relatively well-off' they're talking about. It only took
us four years to save enough to buy a house and we exhausted all of
our savings paying both rent here and mortgage on our house in the
States until we could sell it...8 months after we arrived. Perhaps
they don't save well, or perhaps they really aren't relatively
well-off.
"For Ms White, 27, and Mr McDowall, 26, the prospect is daunting. They
are trying to save $20,000 for their December wedding, and $20,000 for
a deposit on a house. So far, they have put away about $10,000."
WTF $20,000 for a wedding? $1,000 tops for a bang-up party at home
with friends.
Exactly. There's the downpayment right there. They're in their late
twenties and complaining because they don't own a home? Get over it.
Ten grand is almost enough for a downpayment as is.
Ashley
2005-01-09 18:38:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tarla
Exactly. There's the downpayment right there. They're in their late
twenties and complaining because they don't own a home? Get over it.
Ten grand is almost enough for a downpayment as is.
No it's not. You need at least a 10% deposit. How many houses in Auckland do
you know that are going for $100,000?
EMB
2005-01-09 18:58:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ashley
Post by Tarla
Exactly. There's the downpayment right there. They're in their late
twenties and complaining because they don't own a home? Get over it.
Ten grand is almost enough for a downpayment as is.
No it's not. You need at least a 10% deposit. How many houses in Auckland do
you know that are going for $100,000?
There's plenty of opportunity to borrow on 5% deposit, and $200K will
get you a house in Auckland if you're not too fussy about which suburb
you live in. They say they want to live in Onehunga because it's
cheaper - not any more, might be time to look a bit further south.
--
EMB
Gordon
2005-01-09 05:34:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mr Scebe
The problem is that the baby boomers have driven the
price of housing up all around the world, through the demand created by
their greater numbers.
What? If that was the case then your point is somewaht a generation late!
The baby booners started in 1946 to say 1950 something. They are now
middle aged and have grown up children.
Ashley
2005-01-09 05:41:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gordon
Post by Mr Scebe
The problem is that the baby boomers have driven the
price of housing up all around the world, through the demand created by
their greater numbers.
What? If that was the case then your point is somewaht a generation late!
The baby booners started in 1946 to say 1950 something. They are now
middle aged and have grown up children.
The end of the baby boom is generally accepted to be 1961-63, depending on
who's doing the talking. I'm a late baby boomer, and my retirement is 22
years off, at least.
Bobs
2005-01-09 05:43:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ashley
Post by Gordon
Post by Mr Scebe
The problem is that the baby boomers have driven the
price of housing up all around the world, through the demand created by
their greater numbers.
What? If that was the case then your point is somewaht a generation late!
The baby booners started in 1946 to say 1950 something. They are now
middle aged and have grown up children.
The end of the baby boom is generally accepted to be 1961-63, depending on
who's doing the talking. I'm a late baby boomer, and my retirement is 22
years off, at least.
Retirement? LOL. What planet do you live on? By the time you're old and
grey there will be no pension.
Ashley
2005-01-09 05:51:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bobs
Retirement? LOL. What planet do you live on? By the time you're old and
grey there will be no pension.
I disagree. There will be a pension, and it will be sufficient to keep you
off the breadline, but that's it. Anything more than that, individuals will
have to provide for themselves. I fully expect to work 2-3 days a week until
I'm about 70-75. And, quite frankly, that would probably be quite enjoyable.
My mother (66 this year) is still working 3 days a week, but she's also
lucky in being self-employed and able to determine her own hours. She talks
now of gradually decreasing hours, not of stopping work altogether.
Sometimes she complains like hell about still "having" to work (she
doesn't), but the reality is that she is so fascinated by what she does I
don't think she'll stop completely until someone forces her to! And she goes
travelling for at least 3 weeks every year, as well as having copious
shorter holidays within NZ. That is the sort of retirement I'm talking
about - not stopping work, but decreasing hours and not being as controlled
by work.
Bob Howard
2005-01-09 08:45:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mr Scebe
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=9006008
"Emma White's mum and dad disembarked a boat from Britain with only a bed
and a wringer washing machine, and within a year they had bought their first
home. A generation later, Ms White and her fiance, Andrew McDowall, both
from Auckland, can't afford even a small slice of the Kiwi pavlova paradise.
They are the face of a crisis that has put first homes beyond the reach of
even relatively well-off young families, let alone those on low incomes and
benefits."
For fuck's sake, get me a tissue. So they can't afford a house, so (Wobbler)
Cullen's going to hand out the Christmas presents before the election, just
so these fucking dimbulb's can get on the debt bandwagon!
The only problem is, by helping out the govt will cause the exact opposite
effect, which is to increase house price inflation, thereby making it even
more unaffordable for the next generation to get into housing.
I feel a bit sorry for young couples trying to get their own homes. You are
quite right when you say government interference won't help. It will create
opportunities for well off people to make even more money.



Bob Howard.
Barry Lennox
2005-01-09 19:01:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mr Scebe
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=9006008
"Emma White's mum and dad disembarked a boat from Britain with only a bed
and a wringer washing machine, and within a year they had bought their first
home. A generation later, Ms White and her fiance, Andrew McDowall, both
from Auckland, can't afford even a small slice of the Kiwi pavlova paradise.
They are the face of a crisis that has put first homes beyond the reach of
even relatively well-off young families, let alone those on low incomes and
benefits."
But, I note that they wish to spend a mere 20K on their wedding!!!!???
Must be trying for the "Terminally stupid and disorganised cretins"
award for 2005.
Post by Mr Scebe
For fuck's sake, get me a tissue. So they can't afford a house, so (Wobbler)
Cullen's going to hand out the Christmas presents before the election, just
so these fucking dimbulb's can get on the debt bandwagon!
A message to the little evil gnome: "Don't use my taxes to buy these
fuckwits a house, give them one of yours if you feel strongly about
it"
Post by Mr Scebe
The only problem is, by helping out the govt will cause the exact opposite
effect, which is to increase house price inflation, thereby making it even
more unaffordable for the next generation to get into housing.
And why the fucking obsession with it anyway? I am quite happy to live in a
rented house, while my landlord subsidises the shit out of my rent - to the
tune of $130 a week. The problem is that the baby boomers have driven the
price of housing up all around the world, through the demand created by
their greater numbers. This will only be a problem for another couple of
years, by which time the (lack of) housing demand will create a deflationary
environment that will make the 90/91 crash look like a boom.
If you do the numbers properly, and allow for all the ownership costs,
rent's not too bad a deal.

Baby boomers are aged about 50-60 AFAIK, So it will be a lot more than
a "couple of years", more like 10-12-15.
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