Discussion:
And I thought
(too old to reply)
Tony
2021-02-22 02:46:26 UTC
Permalink
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
Nellie the Elephant
2021-02-23 22:22:35 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
James Christophers
2021-02-23 22:54:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.

So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport", it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that comes with it are all.

The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in Auckland, the epicentre of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal, avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear conscience?
Nellie the Elephant
2021-02-23 23:15:58 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport", it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that comes with it are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in Auckland, the epicentre of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal, avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Spithill is an accomplished sailor but is a good example of poor
"sportsmanship", It not matter whether it is just for money, it is
still something that committed sailors will watch and enjoy and then
go back to their sporting amateur weekend sailing with more knowledge
and possibly more ambition. And why not? The same applies to other
"sports" but of course your very own Gilbert Harding would have said
they are not sports but games.
The OP is right, it would have been appropriate to invite the Enios
team without delay and in fact to not do so was very uncivil.
Tony
2021-02-24 00:16:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
Post by Tony
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if nothing
else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned not-even-a-boat,
was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly expect, but by an
Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport", it's all about
money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the corrupt and
corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that comes with it
are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in Auckland, the
epicentre of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal, avaricious culture.
Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Spithill is an accomplished sailor but is a good example of poor
"sportsmanship", It not matter whether it is just for money, it is
still something that committed sailors will watch and enjoy and then
go back to their sporting amateur weekend sailing with more knowledge
and possibly more ambition. And why not? The same applies to other
"sports" but of course your very own Gilbert Harding would have said
they are not sports but games.
The OP is right, it would have been appropriate to invite the Enios
team without delay and in fact to not do so was very uncivil.
Exactly.
James Christophers
2021-02-24 00:35:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport", it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that comes with it are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in Auckland, the epicenter of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal, avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Thank you Nellie. Helmsman/pilot error taken on board in the spirit intended. If anyone might have thought I had intended sardonically to turn the AC into everyman hobby dayboating, then maybe they should continue to enjoy the put-down imagery that conveys. Somehow I feel certain the Technicolor glory boys and their AC loot-men are big enough to take any such allusion on the chin!
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Spithill is an accomplished sailor but is a good example of poor
"sportsmanship", It not matter whether it is just for money, it is
still something that committed sailors will watch and enjoy and then
go back to their sporting amateur weekend sailing with more knowledge
and possibly more ambition. And why not? The same applies to other
"sports" but of course your very own Gilbert Harding would have said
they are not sports but games.
Say, as in "Olympic Games", which does at least help a little to keep the creaking ol' shebang grounded in its original honourablity, severely compromised by scandal and corruption as it may notoriously have become over the decades.

Gilbert Harding seldom shirked the testy, acerbic polemic, deliberately and inappropriately mis-timed as they were more often than not. I remember the irascible old radio and TV personality only too well; in truth, fragile, lost and lonely, this made known by his own admission in a 1960 BBC TV "Face to Face" interview (Youtube segment) given only weeks before he collapsed and died on the steps of Broadcasting House as he was about to step into a taxi. He was only 53.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
The OP is right, it would have been appropriate to invite the Enios
team without delay and in fact to not do so was very uncivil.
To me, it smacks of plain malice aforethought.
Nellie the Elephant
2021-02-24 03:03:29 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 16:35:41 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport", it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that comes with it are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in Auckland, the epicenter of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal, avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Thank you Nellie. Helmsman/pilot error taken on board in the spirit intended. If anyone might have thought I had intended sardonically to turn the AC into everyman hobby dayboating, then maybe they should continue to enjoy the put-down imagery that conveys. Somehow I feel certain the Technicolor glory boys and their AC loot-men are big enough to take any such allusion on the chin!
No problem. I meant it in the interest of accuracy. Unless you were
interested enough to follow the Prada Cup you would be unlikely to
know that stuff. Spithall is the one that hits the news, which is
partly why I posted here. He is a bit of a "dick" really. But clever.
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Spithill is an accomplished sailor but is a good example of poor
"sportsmanship", It not matter whether it is just for money, it is
still something that committed sailors will watch and enjoy and then
go back to their sporting amateur weekend sailing with more knowledge
and possibly more ambition. And why not? The same applies to other
"sports" but of course your very own Gilbert Harding would have said
they are not sports but games.
Say, as in "Olympic Games", which does at least help a little to keep the creaking ol' shebang grounded in its original honourablity, severely compromised by scandal and corruption as it may notoriously have become over the decades.
Gilbert Harding seldom shirked the testy, acerbic polemic, deliberately and inappropriately mis-timed as they were more often than not. I remember the irascible old radio and TV personality only too well; in truth, fragile, lost and lonely, this made known by his own admission in a 1960 BBC TV "Face to Face" interview (Youtube segment) given only weeks before he collapsed and died on the steps of Broadcasting House as he was about to step into a taxi. He was only 53.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
The OP is right, it would have been appropriate to invite the Enios
team without delay and in fact to not do so was very uncivil.
To me, it smacks of plain malice aforethought.
Yes, he's a dick and almost certainly influenced the decision because
his history is full of it.
James Christophers
2021-02-24 03:41:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 16:35:41 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport", it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that comes with it are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in Auckland, the epicenter of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal, avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Thank you Nellie. Helmsman/pilot error taken on board in the spirit intended. If anyone might have thought I had intended sardonically to turn the AC into everyman hobby dayboating, then maybe they should continue to enjoy the put-down imagery that conveys. Somehow I feel certain the Technicolor glory boys and their AC loot-men are big enough to take any such allusion on the chin!
No problem. I meant it in the interest of accuracy.
And no bad thing, either. In debate, I am not alone in veering off-course when I sense the wind is behind me.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Unless you were
interested enough to follow the Prada Cup you would be unlikely to
know that stuff.
During my early and teenage years I lived in idyllic South Devon within literally 50 yards of a tidal Estuary where small boat sailing was a universal habit rather than just a hobby. Just about every youth was into it and there was no shortage of dedicated amateur instructors, either. I built my own GP14 from bare timber and the design plans and drawings and won a couple of junior competitions with it as well. Other non-aquatic-dependent interests soon took over, as they will, and having by the end of my teens moved to London and all that a new career entailed, sailing quietly gave way to other pursuits which are still with me to this day. Great days, though and, thankfully, unforgettable.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Spithall is the one that hits the news, which is partly why I posted here. He is a bit of a "dick" really. But clever.
I'm impressed that today's yachting has reached the stage of development it has, but I'm saddened and totally put off by the artifical razzamatazz and monied excess, plus the spite and invective that goes with today's professional element. It's said, "The Love of money is the root of all evil" and isn't this what you see in all its rancid tawdriness in the likes of Spithill? For these and other suh reasons, I have never learned the language and format of AC competition, nor have I ever watched an AC event - and I never shall.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Spithill is an accomplished sailor but is a good example of poor
"sportsmanship", It not matter whether it is just for money, it is
still something that committed sailors will watch and enjoy and then
go back to their sporting amateur weekend sailing with more knowledge
and possibly more ambition. And why not? The same applies to other
"sports" but of course your very own Gilbert Harding would have said
they are not sports but games.
Say, as in "Olympic Games", which does at least help a little to keep the creaking ol' shebang grounded in its original honourablity, severely compromised by scandal and corruption as it may notoriously have become over the decades.
Gilbert Harding seldom shirked the testy, acerbic polemic, deliberately and inappropriately mis-timed as they were more often than not. I remember the irascible old radio and TV personality only too well; in truth, fragile, lost and lonely, this made known by his own admission in a 1960 BBC TV "Face to Face" interview (Youtube segment) given only weeks before he collapsed and died on the steps of Broadcasting House as he was about to step into a taxi. He was only 53.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
The OP is right, it would have been appropriate to invite the Enios
team without delay and in fact to not do so was very uncivil.
To me, it smacks of plain malice aforethought.
Yes, he's a dick and almost certainly influenced the decision because
his history is full of it.
Plus, "Italian" is but seven syllables distant from "Mafiosi" (!).
Nellie the Elephant
2021-02-24 06:09:02 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 19:41:44 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 16:35:41 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport", it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that comes with it are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in Auckland, the epicenter of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal, avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Thank you Nellie. Helmsman/pilot error taken on board in the spirit intended. If anyone might have thought I had intended sardonically to turn the AC into everyman hobby dayboating, then maybe they should continue to enjoy the put-down imagery that conveys. Somehow I feel certain the Technicolor glory boys and their AC loot-men are big enough to take any such allusion on the chin!
No problem. I meant it in the interest of accuracy.
And no bad thing, either. In debate, I am not alone in veering off-course when I sense the wind is behind me.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Unless you were
interested enough to follow the Prada Cup you would be unlikely to
know that stuff.
During my early and teenage years I lived in idyllic South Devon within literally 50 yards of a tidal Estuary where small boat sailing was a universal habit rather than just a hobby. Just about every youth was into it and there was no shortage of dedicated amateur instructors, either. I built my own GP14 from bare timber and the design plans and drawings and won a couple of junior competitions with it as well. Other non-aquatic-dependent interests soon took over, as they will, and having by the end of my teens moved to London and all that a new career entailed, sailing quietly gave way to other pursuits which are still with me to this day. Great days, though and, thankfully, unforgettable.
I was invited to sail in England during the first decade of this
century by an old friend and competitor who lived in Brixham. He was,
and still is, a commercial fisherman but lives for sailing.
We sailed on Tor Bay (J14s, a Kiwii design) on and off for 2 weeks
with his racing friends and what a privilege that was.
My lack of local knowledge was a problem but he helped (most of the
time!). Great holiday and probably not to be repeated this decade.
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Spithall is the one that hits the news, which is partly why I posted here. He is a bit of a "dick" really. But clever.
I'm impressed that today's yachting has reached the stage of development it has, but I'm saddened and totally put off by the artifical razzamatazz and monied excess, plus the spite and invective that goes with today's professional element. It's said, "The Love of money is the root of all evil" and isn't this what you see in all its rancid tawdriness in the likes of Spithill? For these and other suh reasons, I have never learned the language and format of AC competition, nor have I ever watched an AC event - and I never shall.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Spithill is an accomplished sailor but is a good example of poor
"sportsmanship", It not matter whether it is just for money, it is
still something that committed sailors will watch and enjoy and then
go back to their sporting amateur weekend sailing with more knowledge
and possibly more ambition. And why not? The same applies to other
"sports" but of course your very own Gilbert Harding would have said
they are not sports but games.
Say, as in "Olympic Games", which does at least help a little to keep the creaking ol' shebang grounded in its original honourablity, severely compromised by scandal and corruption as it may notoriously have become over the decades.
Gilbert Harding seldom shirked the testy, acerbic polemic, deliberately and inappropriately mis-timed as they were more often than not. I remember the irascible old radio and TV personality only too well; in truth, fragile, lost and lonely, this made known by his own admission in a 1960 BBC TV "Face to Face" interview (Youtube segment) given only weeks before he collapsed and died on the steps of Broadcasting House as he was about to step into a taxi. He was only 53.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
The OP is right, it would have been appropriate to invite the Enios
team without delay and in fact to not do so was very uncivil.
To me, it smacks of plain malice aforethought.
Yes, he's a dick and almost certainly influenced the decision because
his history is full of it.
Plus, "Italian" is but seven syllables distant from "Mafiosi" (!).
James Christophers
2021-02-25 20:45:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 19:41:44 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 16:35:41 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport", it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that comes with it are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in Auckland, the epicenter of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal, avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Thank you Nellie. Helmsman/pilot error taken on board in the spirit intended. If anyone might have thought I had intended sardonically to turn the AC into everyman hobby dayboating, then maybe they should continue to enjoy the put-down imagery that conveys. Somehow I feel certain the Technicolor glory boys and their AC loot-men are big enough to take any such allusion on the chin!
No problem. I meant it in the interest of accuracy.
And no bad thing, either. In debate, I am not alone in veering off-course when I sense the wind is behind me.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Unless you were
interested enough to follow the Prada Cup you would be unlikely to
know that stuff.
During my early and teenage years I lived in idyllic South Devon within literally 50 yards of a tidal Estuary where small boat sailing was a universal habit rather than just a hobby. Just about every youth was into it and there was no shortage of dedicated amateur instructors, either. I built my own GP14 from bare timber and the design plans and drawings and won a couple of junior competitions with it as well. Other non-aquatic-dependent interests soon took over, as they will, and having by the end of my teens moved to London and all that a new career entailed, sailing quietly gave way to other pursuits which are still with me to this day. Great days, though and, thankfully, unforgettable.
I was invited to sail in England during the first decade of this
century by an old friend and competitor who lived in Brixham. He was,
and still is, a commercial fisherman but lives for sailing.
We sailed on Tor Bay (J14s, a Kiwii design) on and off for 2 weeks
with his racing friends and what a privilege that was.
My lack of local knowledge was a problem but he helped (most of the
time!). Great holiday and probably not to be repeated this decade.
Until I was in my third decade I lived in Kingsbridge, SW of Brixham and about 1.5kms down the easterly side of the estuary (google maps/sat view). My home was about 60ft ASL and was on a long "hockey=stick" u-bend (see map) offering spectacular panoramic views directly down the estuary almost to Salcombe harbour at its mouth, where I sailed. All of it 100% unremarked until I moved to London in the early 60's to be employed in broadcasting and "the big life" etc. - only later to be realised for the idyll it was the first time I returned to KB about three years later.
Nellie the Elephant
2021-02-27 02:56:46 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 25 Feb 2021 12:45:57 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 19:41:44 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 16:35:41 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport", it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that comes with it are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in Auckland, the epicenter of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal, avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Thank you Nellie. Helmsman/pilot error taken on board in the spirit intended. If anyone might have thought I had intended sardonically to turn the AC into everyman hobby dayboating, then maybe they should continue to enjoy the put-down imagery that conveys. Somehow I feel certain the Technicolor glory boys and their AC loot-men are big enough to take any such allusion on the chin!
No problem. I meant it in the interest of accuracy.
And no bad thing, either. In debate, I am not alone in veering off-course when I sense the wind is behind me.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Unless you were
interested enough to follow the Prada Cup you would be unlikely to
know that stuff.
During my early and teenage years I lived in idyllic South Devon within literally 50 yards of a tidal Estuary where small boat sailing was a universal habit rather than just a hobby. Just about every youth was into it and there was no shortage of dedicated amateur instructors, either. I built my own GP14 from bare timber and the design plans and drawings and won a couple of junior competitions with it as well. Other non-aquatic-dependent interests soon took over, as they will, and having by the end of my teens moved to London and all that a new career entailed, sailing quietly gave way to other pursuits which are still with me to this day. Great days, though and, thankfully, unforgettable.
I was invited to sail in England during the first decade of this
century by an old friend and competitor who lived in Brixham. He was,
and still is, a commercial fisherman but lives for sailing.
We sailed on Tor Bay (J14s, a Kiwii design) on and off for 2 weeks
with his racing friends and what a privilege that was.
My lack of local knowledge was a problem but he helped (most of the
time!). Great holiday and probably not to be repeated this decade.
Until I was in my third decade I lived in Kingsbridge, SW of Brixham and about 1.5kms down the easterly side of the estuary (google maps/sat view). My home was about 60ft ASL and was on a long "hockey=stick" u-bend (see map) offering spectacular panoramic views directly down the estuary almost to Salcombe harbour at its mouth, where I sailed. All of it 100% unremarked until I moved to London in the early 60's to be employed in broadcasting and "the big life" etc. - only later to be realised for the idyll it was the first time I returned to KB about three years later.
So you lived on Embankment Road or was it above there?
Google Earth shows some old large houses as well as more modern and
modest houses on those roads.
I was hoping to visit again in May last year but that didn't happen.
I met a couple of people from Torquay when I visited some years ago,
they called it the Queen of the English Riviera, a little fanciful but
very pretty in a touristy way. Pub lunches out of the towns were as
good as I had remembered them from previous visits, my folks were from
Cornwall.
James Christophers
2021-02-27 05:33:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Thu, 25 Feb 2021 12:45:57 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 19:41:44 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 16:35:41 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport", it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that comes with it are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in Auckland, the epicenter of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal, avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Thank you Nellie. Helmsman/pilot error taken on board in the spirit intended. If anyone might have thought I had intended sardonically to turn the AC into everyman hobby dayboating, then maybe they should continue to enjoy the put-down imagery that conveys. Somehow I feel certain the Technicolor glory boys and their AC loot-men are big enough to take any such allusion on the chin!
No problem. I meant it in the interest of accuracy.
And no bad thing, either. In debate, I am not alone in veering off-course when I sense the wind is behind me.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Unless you were
interested enough to follow the Prada Cup you would be unlikely to
know that stuff.
During my early and teenage years I lived in idyllic South Devon within literally 50 yards of a tidal Estuary where small boat sailing was a universal habit rather than just a hobby. Just about every youth was into it and there was no shortage of dedicated amateur instructors, either. I built my own GP14 from bare timber and the design plans and drawings and won a couple of junior competitions with it as well. Other non-aquatic-dependent interests soon took over, as they will, and having by the end of my teens moved to London and all that a new career entailed, sailing quietly gave way to other pursuits which are still with me to this day. Great days, though and, thankfully, unforgettable.
I was invited to sail in England during the first decade of this
century by an old friend and competitor who lived in Brixham. He was,
and still is, a commercial fisherman but lives for sailing.
We sailed on Tor Bay (J14s, a Kiwii design) on and off for 2 weeks
with his racing friends and what a privilege that was.
My lack of local knowledge was a problem but he helped (most of the
time!). Great holiday and probably not to be repeated this decade.
Until I was in my third decade I lived in Kingsbridge, SW of Brixham and about 1.5kms down the easterly side of the estuary (google maps/sat view). My home was about 60ft ASL and was on a long "hockey=stick" u-bend (see map) offering spectacular panoramic views directly down the estuary almost to Salcombe harbour at its mouth, where I sailed. All of it 100% unremarked until I moved to London in the early 60's to be employed in broadcasting and "the big life" etc. - only later to be realised for the idyll it was the first time I returned to KB about three years later.
So you lived on Embankment Road or was it above there?
Google Earth shows some old large houses as well as more modern and
modest houses on those roads.
Yup. No 39. At road level you'll see the google "streetview" down the Estuary is blocked by more recent development lower down towrds the water but at the house's elevation it's still clear. My parents had it built when they were wed in 1933. £800! When I chanced a passing visit with its the-current owners in 2005 it was still standing there in line with all the others of its vintage, stolid and firm as ever. I called on them unannounced having seen them pottering in the front garden. They were somewhat taken aback byt my claim that I had lived my early years there until I mysteriously asked if the pipe runnng under the header cistern in the attic was still frost insulated with a make-do strip of old wartime wraparound blanket! They were so astounded that they invited me straight in there and there! And we clambered into the attic and examined the still in-place blanket strip to my pleasured grunts of familar recognition. Talk about deja vu! They had bought the house in 1982 after my father died and so after all that time they were still only the second owners it had ever known. I had not been in KB, let alone that house, since 1982. Funny ol' world.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
I was hoping to visit again in May last year but that didn't happen.
I met a couple of people from Torquay when I visited some years ago,
they called it the Queen of the English Riviera, a little fanciful but
very pretty in a touristy way. Pub lunches out of the towns were as
good as I had remembered them from previous visits, my folks were from
Cornwall.
Prahper jaahb, boy! Did your mum ever make stargazy pie?

https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=cornish+star+gazy+pie
Nellie the Elephant
2021-03-05 23:37:31 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 26 Feb 2021 21:33:20 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Thu, 25 Feb 2021 12:45:57 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 19:41:44 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 16:35:41 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so many Italians
have moved there over the years.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship, been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport", it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that comes with it are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in Auckland, the epicenter of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal, avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Thank you Nellie. Helmsman/pilot error taken on board in the spirit intended. If anyone might have thought I had intended sardonically to turn the AC into everyman hobby dayboating, then maybe they should continue to enjoy the put-down imagery that conveys. Somehow I feel certain the Technicolor glory boys and their AC loot-men are big enough to take any such allusion on the chin!
No problem. I meant it in the interest of accuracy.
And no bad thing, either. In debate, I am not alone in veering off-course when I sense the wind is behind me.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Unless you were
interested enough to follow the Prada Cup you would be unlikely to
know that stuff.
During my early and teenage years I lived in idyllic South Devon within literally 50 yards of a tidal Estuary where small boat sailing was a universal habit rather than just a hobby. Just about every youth was into it and there was no shortage of dedicated amateur instructors, either. I built my own GP14 from bare timber and the design plans and drawings and won a couple of junior competitions with it as well. Other non-aquatic-dependent interests soon took over, as they will, and having by the end of my teens moved to London and all that a new career entailed, sailing quietly gave way to other pursuits which are still with me to this day. Great days, though and, thankfully, unforgettable.
I was invited to sail in England during the first decade of this
century by an old friend and competitor who lived in Brixham. He was,
and still is, a commercial fisherman but lives for sailing.
We sailed on Tor Bay (J14s, a Kiwii design) on and off for 2 weeks
with his racing friends and what a privilege that was.
My lack of local knowledge was a problem but he helped (most of the
time!). Great holiday and probably not to be repeated this decade.
Until I was in my third decade I lived in Kingsbridge, SW of Brixham and about 1.5kms down the easterly side of the estuary (google maps/sat view). My home was about 60ft ASL and was on a long "hockey=stick" u-bend (see map) offering spectacular panoramic views directly down the estuary almost to Salcombe harbour at its mouth, where I sailed. All of it 100% unremarked until I moved to London in the early 60's to be employed in broadcasting and "the big life" etc. - only later to be realised for the idyll it was the first time I returned to KB about three years later.
So you lived on Embankment Road or was it above there?
Google Earth shows some old large houses as well as more modern and
modest houses on those roads.
Yup. No 39. At road level you'll see the google "streetview" down the Estuary is blocked by more recent development lower down towrds the water but at the house's elevation it's still clear. My parents had it built when they were wed in 1933. £800! When I chanced a passing visit with its the-current owners in 2005 it was still standing there in line with all the others of its vintage, stolid and firm as ever. I called on them unannounced having seen them pottering in the front garden. They were somewhat taken aback byt my claim that I had lived my early years there until I mysteriously asked if the pipe runnng under the header cistern in the attic was still frost insulated with a make-do strip of old wartime wraparound blanket! They were so astounded that they invited me straight in there and there! And we clambered into the attic and examined the still in-place blanket strip to my pleasured grunts of familar recognition. Talk about deja vu! They had bought the house in 1982
after my father died and so after all that time they were still only the second owners it had ever known. I had not been in KB, let alone that house, since 1982. Funny ol' world.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
I was hoping to visit again in May last year but that didn't happen.
I met a couple of people from Torquay when I visited some years ago,
they called it the Queen of the English Riviera, a little fanciful but
very pretty in a touristy way. Pub lunches out of the towns were as
good as I had remembered them from previous visits, my folks were from
Cornwall.
Prahper jaahb, boy! Did your mum ever make stargazy pie?
https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=cornish+star+gazy+pie
I do not remember that particular dish.
There is a reason for my delay in responding. In fact there are two
reasons.
The first is that I was in Auckland with my immediate family visiting
a sick relative when level 3 was put in place. Rather than fight the
traffic to get out of the city (and we had the legal right to do so
being resident elsewhere) we decided to stay. Our relative has
recovered and we are now home.
The second reason is that while I was there I had a look at this
newsgroup's posts and became intrigued by some of the so-called
discussions. There are protagonists of all sorts.
I find the deliberate attempt by some to belittle others to be
offensive and childish, particularly when done anonymously. It is even
more objectionable when it done in a superior and patronising manner
that is poorly disguised as reason. You presented the last straw
today.
So I needed time to think and took it.
I met many people from the general area when in Devon and was
particularly impressed at how friendly they were. On the whole I found
Devonshire people, especially in Torbay, to be delightful and warm.
I should not be surprised that there were and are exceptions.
I have no wish to continue this conversation.
Tony
2021-03-06 03:22:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Fri, 26 Feb 2021 21:33:20 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Thu, 25 Feb 2021 12:45:57 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 19:41:44 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 16:35:41 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
On Wednesday, 24 February 2021 at 12:16:06 UTC+13, Nellie the
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
On Wednesday, 24 February 2021 at 11:22:42 UTC+13, Nellie the
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon
dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so
many Italians
have moved there over the years.
Post by Tony
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship,
been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a
dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well
done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if
nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned
not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly
expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport",
it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the
corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that
comes with it are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in
Auckland, the epicenter of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal,
avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear
conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Thank you Nellie. Helmsman/pilot error taken on board in the spirit
intended. If anyone might have thought I had intended sardonically to turn the
AC into everyman hobby dayboating, then maybe they should continue to enjoy the
put-down imagery that conveys. Somehow I feel certain the Technicolor glory
boys and their AC loot-men are big enough to take any such allusion on the
chin!
No problem. I meant it in the interest of accuracy.
And no bad thing, either. In debate, I am not alone in veering
off-course when I sense the wind is behind me.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Unless you were
interested enough to follow the Prada Cup you would be unlikely to
know that stuff.
During my early and teenage years I lived in idyllic South Devon within
literally 50 yards of a tidal Estuary where small boat sailing was a universal
habit rather than just a hobby. Just about every youth was into it and there
was no shortage of dedicated amateur instructors, either. I built my own GP14
from bare timber and the design plans and drawings and won a couple of junior
competitions with it as well. Other non-aquatic-dependent interests soon took
over, as they will, and having by the end of my teens moved to London and all
that a new career entailed, sailing quietly gave way to other pursuits which
are still with me to this day. Great days, though and, thankfully,
unforgettable.
I was invited to sail in England during the first decade of this
century by an old friend and competitor who lived in Brixham. He was,
and still is, a commercial fisherman but lives for sailing.
We sailed on Tor Bay (J14s, a Kiwii design) on and off for 2 weeks
with his racing friends and what a privilege that was.
My lack of local knowledge was a problem but he helped (most of the
time!). Great holiday and probably not to be repeated this decade.
Until I was in my third decade I lived in Kingsbridge, SW of Brixham and
about 1.5kms down the easterly side of the estuary (google maps/sat view). My
home was about 60ft ASL and was on a long "hockey=stick" u-bend (see map)
offering spectacular panoramic views directly down the estuary almost to
Salcombe harbour at its mouth, where I sailed. All of it 100% unremarked until
I moved to London in the early 60's to be employed in broadcasting and "the big
life" etc. - only later to be realised for the idyll it was the first time I
returned to KB about three years later.
So you lived on Embankment Road or was it above there?
Google Earth shows some old large houses as well as more modern and
modest houses on those roads.
Yup. No 39. At road level you'll see the google "streetview" down the
Estuary is blocked by more recent development lower down towrds the water but
at the house's elevation it's still clear. My parents had it built when they
were wed in 1933. £800! When I chanced a passing visit with its the-current
owners in 2005 it was still standing there in line with all the others of its
vintage, stolid and firm as ever. I called on them unannounced having seen them
pottering in the front garden. They were somewhat taken aback byt my claim
that I had lived my early years there until I mysteriously asked if the pipe
runnng under the header cistern in the attic was still frost insulated with a
make-do strip of old wartime wraparound blanket! They were so astounded that
they invited me straight in there and there! And we clambered into the attic
and examined the still in-place blanket strip to my pleasured grunts of familar
recognition. Talk about deja vu! They had bought the house in 1982
after my father died and so after all that time they were still only the
second owners it had ever known. I had not been in KB, let alone that house,
since 1982. Funny ol' world.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
I was hoping to visit again in May last year but that didn't happen.
I met a couple of people from Torquay when I visited some years ago,
they called it the Queen of the English Riviera, a little fanciful but
very pretty in a touristy way. Pub lunches out of the towns were as
good as I had remembered them from previous visits, my folks were from
Cornwall.
Prahper jaahb, boy! Did your mum ever make stargazy pie?
https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=cornish+star+gazy+pie
I do not remember that particular dish.
There is a reason for my delay in responding. In fact there are two
reasons.
The first is that I was in Auckland with my immediate family visiting
a sick relative when level 3 was put in place. Rather than fight the
traffic to get out of the city (and we had the legal right to do so
being resident elsewhere) we decided to stay. Our relative has
recovered and we are now home.
The second reason is that while I was there I had a look at this
newsgroup's posts and became intrigued by some of the so-called
discussions. There are protagonists of all sorts.
I find the deliberate attempt by some to belittle others to be
offensive and childish, particularly when done anonymously. It is even
more objectionable when it done in a superior and patronising manner
that is poorly disguised as reason. You presented the last straw
today.
So I needed time to think and took it.
I met many people from the general area when in Devon and was
particularly impressed at how friendly they were. On the whole I found
Devonshire people, especially in Torbay, to be delightful and warm.
I should not be surprised that there were and are exceptions.
I have no wish to continue this conversation.
Well done, he really is horrible isn't he?
Ainulindale_world_that_is
2021-03-07 07:27:37 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 05 Mar 2021 21:22:03 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Fri, 26 Feb 2021 21:33:20 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Thu, 25 Feb 2021 12:45:57 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 19:41:44 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 16:35:41 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
On Wednesday, 24 February 2021 at 12:16:06 UTC+13, Nellie the
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 14:54:37 -0800 (PST), James Christophers
On Wednesday, 24 February 2021 at 11:22:42 UTC+13, Nellie the
Post by Nellie the Elephant
On Sun, 21 Feb 2021 20:46:26 -0600, Tony <lizandtony at orcon
dot net
Post by Tony
that Australians were not very sporting, maybe that is why so
many Italians
have moved there over the years.
Post by Tony
https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/americas-cup/124316746/americas-cup-sir-ben-ainslies-anger-at-final-insult-after-team-uks-prada-cup-loss
I'm afraid the Aussies have lost all sense of sportsmanship,
been like
that for many years now. In fact they seem to have taken a
dislike to
this country in particular. Got hammered on Monday though. Well
done
Black Caps.
At least the UK boat had UK Ainslie skippering it. Honourable, if
nothing else. The Prada Cup's owners and sponsors of the Prada-owned
not-even-a-boat, was skippered not by an Italian as one might sports-mindedly
expect, but by an Australian pilot-for-hire, the estimable Spithill.
So, for the umpteenth time in so-called professional "sport",
it's all about money, not sportsmanship - the way of things today where the
corrupt and corrupting commercial imperative and the hirer's shilling that
comes with it are all.
The cynic might even drily observe that the AC is held in
Auckland, the epicenter of New Zealand's growingly degenerate, venal,
avaricious culture. Who could honestly contradict him and do so with a clear
conscience?
I genuinely hate to correct you James but the Skipper of the Italian
boat is Max Sirena, an Italian. Jimmy Spithill shared the helm with
another Italian Francesco Bruni.
Thank you Nellie. Helmsman/pilot error taken on board in the spirit
intended. If anyone might have thought I had intended sardonically to turn the
AC into everyman hobby dayboating, then maybe they should continue to enjoy the
put-down imagery that conveys. Somehow I feel certain the Technicolor glory
boys and their AC loot-men are big enough to take any such allusion on the
chin!
No problem. I meant it in the interest of accuracy.
And no bad thing, either. In debate, I am not alone in veering
off-course when I sense the wind is behind me.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
Unless you were
interested enough to follow the Prada Cup you would be unlikely to
know that stuff.
During my early and teenage years I lived in idyllic South Devon within
literally 50 yards of a tidal Estuary where small boat sailing was a universal
habit rather than just a hobby. Just about every youth was into it and there
was no shortage of dedicated amateur instructors, either. I built my own GP14
from bare timber and the design plans and drawings and won a couple of junior
competitions with it as well. Other non-aquatic-dependent interests soon took
over, as they will, and having by the end of my teens moved to London and all
that a new career entailed, sailing quietly gave way to other pursuits which
are still with me to this day. Great days, though and, thankfully,
unforgettable.
I was invited to sail in England during the first decade of this
century by an old friend and competitor who lived in Brixham. He was,
and still is, a commercial fisherman but lives for sailing.
We sailed on Tor Bay (J14s, a Kiwii design) on and off for 2 weeks
with his racing friends and what a privilege that was.
My lack of local knowledge was a problem but he helped (most of the
time!). Great holiday and probably not to be repeated this decade.
Until I was in my third decade I lived in Kingsbridge, SW of Brixham and
about 1.5kms down the easterly side of the estuary (google maps/sat view). My
home was about 60ft ASL and was on a long "hockey=stick" u-bend (see map)
offering spectacular panoramic views directly down the estuary almost to
Salcombe harbour at its mouth, where I sailed. All of it 100% unremarked until
I moved to London in the early 60's to be employed in broadcasting and "the big
life" etc. - only later to be realised for the idyll it was the first time I
returned to KB about three years later.
So you lived on Embankment Road or was it above there?
Google Earth shows some old large houses as well as more modern and
modest houses on those roads.
Yup. No 39. At road level you'll see the google "streetview" down the
Estuary is blocked by more recent development lower down towrds the water but
at the house's elevation it's still clear. My parents had it built when they
were wed in 1933. £800! When I chanced a passing visit with its the-current
owners in 2005 it was still standing there in line with all the others of its
vintage, stolid and firm as ever. I called on them unannounced having seen them
pottering in the front garden. They were somewhat taken aback byt my claim
that I had lived my early years there until I mysteriously asked if the pipe
runnng under the header cistern in the attic was still frost insulated with a
make-do strip of old wartime wraparound blanket! They were so astounded that
they invited me straight in there and there! And we clambered into the attic
and examined the still in-place blanket strip to my pleasured grunts of familar
recognition. Talk about deja vu! They had bought the house in 1982
after my father died and so after all that time they were still only the
second owners it had ever known. I had not been in KB, let alone that house,
since 1982. Funny ol' world.
Post by Nellie the Elephant
I was hoping to visit again in May last year but that didn't happen.
I met a couple of people from Torquay when I visited some years ago,
they called it the Queen of the English Riviera, a little fanciful but
very pretty in a touristy way. Pub lunches out of the towns were as
good as I had remembered them from previous visits, my folks were from
Cornwall.
Prahper jaahb, boy! Did your mum ever make stargazy pie?
https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=cornish+star+gazy+pie
I do not remember that particular dish.
There is a reason for my delay in responding. In fact there are two
reasons.
The first is that I was in Auckland with my immediate family visiting
a sick relative when level 3 was put in place. Rather than fight the
traffic to get out of the city (and we had the legal right to do so
being resident elsewhere) we decided to stay. Our relative has
recovered and we are now home.
The second reason is that while I was there I had a look at this
newsgroup's posts and became intrigued by some of the so-called
discussions. There are protagonists of all sorts.
I find the deliberate attempt by some to belittle others to be
offensive and childish, particularly when done anonymously. It is even
more objectionable when it done in a superior and patronising manner
that is poorly disguised as reason. You presented the last straw
today.
So I needed time to think and took it.
I met many people from the general area when in Devon and was
particularly impressed at how friendly they were. On the whole I found
Devonshire people, especially in Torbay, to be delightful and warm.
I should not be surprised that there were and are exceptions.
I have no wish to continue this conversation.
Well done, he really is horrible isn't he?
Yes well done indeed. A person of principle nad perspicacity.

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