Discussion:
Preparation for more electric vehicles continues
Add Reply
Rich80105
2021-07-19 07:29:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?

The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
has not had much success since being elected - from the article:

"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.

“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
John Bowes
2021-07-19 08:24:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
Rich80105
2021-07-19 09:29:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/

There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Tony
2021-07-20 02:54:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
Crash
2021-07-20 04:13:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:54:30 -0500, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
There is an interesting thread on this subject on geekzone - an
NZ-based technology website. In that thread there is a post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate and the supply at any other time of the day is
non-existent (because Huntly is keeping the whole system afloat).

The fact is that if EV's are successfully marketed and sold, we need
to plan now for the increased clean-green generating capacity in order
for it to come online in the next 10 to 20 years. The current
Government seems to be unaware of this or they think we can wait to
see how market trends with EV's shape up.


--
Crash McBash
Tony
2021-07-20 04:42:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Crash
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:54:30 -0500, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
There is an interesting thread on this subject on geekzone - an
NZ-based technology website. In that thread there is a post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate and the supply at any other time of the day is
non-existent (because Huntly is keeping the whole system afloat).
The fact is that if EV's are successfully marketed and sold, we need
to plan now for the increased clean-green generating capacity in order
for it to come online in the next 10 to 20 years. The current
Government seems to be unaware of this or they think we can wait to
see how market trends with EV's shape up.
I am well acquainted with geekzone and in fact have contributed there
occasionally.
I have been saying for months that the headlong rush to EVs has serious issues
to overcome.
Generation, electricity storage and handling of toxic wastes have no
governmental focus.
Utter nonsense, driven by political desire to look like they are competent.
Post by Crash
--
Crash McBash
Rich80105
2021-07-20 04:50:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Crash
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:54:30 -0500, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
There is an interesting thread on this subject on geekzone - an
NZ-based technology website. In that thread there is a post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate and the supply at any other time of the day is
non-existent (because Huntly is keeping the whole system afloat).
The fact is that if EV's are successfully marketed and sold, we need
to plan now for the increased clean-green generating capacity in order
for it to come online in the next 10 to 20 years. The current
Government seems to be unaware of this or they think we can wait to
see how market trends with EV's shape up.
A government some years ago took steps to remove government from both
electricity generation or distribution; we now have a market place
with a number of competing companies for each stage of delivery,
working in a free market to maximise profits though efficiencies and
taking advantage of competitive advantages between themselves. EVs are
often charged overnight. From above, there is currently an advantage
to our system in using off peak power, but that may not last.

For the owner of Manapouri, high demand is desirable, and closing the
smelter may release too much supply to sustain prices in the South
Isaland at least. The link across Cook Strait is possibly running
close to capacity; there may be advantages in spending the capital to
allow higher delivery north, but transmission losses suggest we should
be developing generation in the North Island anyway. In the short term
the answer is that for the North Island, prices are likely to
increase, which may make it more desirable for individuals and groups
to develop more solar generation. In the meantime, raising prices may
assist generate some of the capital needed for that development.

Given that we have such an effective market, the question does need to
be asked as to why some believe the governmen should be doing the work
for those market participants - if demand increases, then after prices
have increased sufficiently there will be an incentive for companies
to develop further generation as needed.

Are those wanting the government to "do something" prepared to pay for
that work? Or should they be charging the current electricity industry
body that is already doing projections of generation and demand and
sharing the results? Should the government set up a generation company
to compete in the industry itself? Or do those calling for the
government to get involved just have shares in current companies and
want a subsidy?
John Bowes
2021-07-20 07:20:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rich80105
Post by Crash
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:54:30 -0500, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
There is an interesting thread on this subject on geekzone - an
NZ-based technology website. In that thread there is a post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate and the supply at any other time of the day is
non-existent (because Huntly is keeping the whole system afloat).
The fact is that if EV's are successfully marketed and sold, we need
to plan now for the increased clean-green generating capacity in order
for it to come online in the next 10 to 20 years. The current
Government seems to be unaware of this or they think we can wait to
see how market trends with EV's shape up.
A government some years ago took steps to remove government from both
electricity generation or distribution; we now have a market place
with a number of competing companies for each stage of delivery,
working in a free market to maximise profits though efficiencies and
taking advantage of competitive advantages between themselves. EVs are
often charged overnight. From above, there is currently an advantage
to our system in using off peak power, but that may not last.
For the owner of Manapouri, high demand is desirable, and closing the
smelter may release too much supply to sustain prices in the South
Isaland at least. The link across Cook Strait is possibly running
close to capacity; there may be advantages in spending the capital to
allow higher delivery north, but transmission losses suggest we should
be developing generation in the North Island anyway. In the short term
the answer is that for the North Island, prices are likely to
increase, which may make it more desirable for individuals and groups
to develop more solar generation. In the meantime, raising prices may
assist generate some of the capital needed for that development.
Given that we have such an effective market, the question does need to
be asked as to why some believe the governmen should be doing the work
for those market participants - if demand increases, then after prices
have increased sufficiently there will be an incentive for companies
to develop further generation as needed.
But the market isn't effective Rich! Huntly is using imported dirty coal to keep up with the load. It'd be much better if the government hadn't killed the gas industry arbitrarily!
Here's a link that shows your talking shit or hoping your opinion is worth more than a knob of goat shit Rich!
https://www.transpower.co.nz/sites/default/files/interfaces/wrn/WRN%20Insufficient%20Generation%20offers%20National%203994870484.pdf
Post by Rich80105
Are those wanting the government to "do something" prepared to pay for
that work? Or should they be charging the current electricity industry
body that is already doing projections of generation and demand and
sharing the results? Should the government set up a generation company
to compete in the industry itself? Or do those calling for the
government to get involved just have shares in current companies and
want a subsidy?
Probably not Rich. Just have a better understanding of what is needed to make the governments dream of an electric country come true. If they fail EVs will be useless!
Crash
2021-07-20 08:48:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rich80105
Post by Crash
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:54:30 -0500, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
There is an interesting thread on this subject on geekzone - an
NZ-based technology website. In that thread there is a post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate and the supply at any other time of the day is
non-existent (because Huntly is keeping the whole system afloat).
The fact is that if EV's are successfully marketed and sold, we need
to plan now for the increased clean-green generating capacity in order
for it to come online in the next 10 to 20 years. The current
Government seems to be unaware of this or they think we can wait to
see how market trends with EV's shape up.
A government some years ago took steps to remove government from both
electricity generation or distribution; we now have a market place
with a number of competing companies for each stage of delivery,
working in a free market to maximise profits though efficiencies and
taking advantage of competitive advantages between themselves.
That government was not encouraging the migration of our car fleet to
EV's. This government is. You are truly desperate when you attempt
to introduce irrelevancies such as this.
Post by Rich80105
EVs are
often charged overnight. From above, there is currently an advantage
to our system in using off peak power, but that may not last.
From my earlier post: "In that thread there is a [Geekzone] post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate".
Post by Rich80105
For the owner of Manapouri, high demand is desirable, and closing the
smelter may release too much supply to sustain prices in the South
Isaland at least. The link across Cook Strait is possibly running
close to capacity; there may be advantages in spending the capital to
allow higher delivery north, but transmission losses suggest we should
be developing generation in the North Island anyway. In the short term
the answer is that for the North Island, prices are likely to
increase, which may make it more desirable for individuals and groups
to develop more solar generation. In the meantime, raising prices may
assist generate some of the capital needed for that development.
Given that we have such an effective market, the question does need to
be asked as to why some believe the governmen should be doing the work
for those market participants - if demand increases, then after prices
have increased sufficiently there will be an incentive for companies
to develop further generation as needed.
Are those wanting the government to "do something" prepared to pay for
that work? Or should they be charging the current electricity industry
body that is already doing projections of generation and demand and
sharing the results? Should the government set up a generation company
to compete in the industry itself? Or do those calling for the
government to get involved just have shares in current companies and
want a subsidy?
You have completely the wrong angle Rich80105 because it is your only
defence. The Government has embarked on an initiative to encourage us
to buy EV's in preference to ICE vehicles, but has no plan to migrate
our electricity grid to supply them with that from 'green' energy
sources. The nature of the current market is irrelevant. The
presence or absence of the Tiwai Smelter is also irrelevant, because
the power consumption it currently uses is so trivial (compared to hat
required to supply electricity to EV's) that even if the smelter shut
down it buys too short a buffer period. The Government clearly has no
idea what the impact on electricity supply would be if we reached
their nirvana of transport that is EV-based. If the Government
succeeds in this we will not be able to get the required new levels of
electricity supply online fast enough, regardless of whether the
industry is privately funded or remains dominated by SOE's as it is
now. That is the thrust from the Geekzone poster.


--
Crash McBash
Gordon
2021-07-21 04:40:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Post by Crash
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:54:30 -0500, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
There is an interesting thread on this subject on geekzone - an
NZ-based technology website. In that thread there is a post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate and the supply at any other time of the day is
non-existent (because Huntly is keeping the whole system afloat).
Well, Huntly can not be taken off line without many votes being lost, along
with the power supply.

Logic says that if we are going EV 100% by 2030 and allowing for the climate
emergency, the Government should b\at the very least have a plan to
decomissioning Huntly without the lights going out. Rich, is there one?
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Post by Crash
The fact is that if EV's are successfully marketed and sold, we need
to plan now for the increased clean-green generating capacity in order
for it to come online in the next 10 to 20 years.
No, to-day as Huntly needs to be decommisioned now. First thing first.
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
A government some years ago took steps to remove government from both
electricity generation or distribution; we now have a market place
with a number of competing companies for each stage of delivery,
working in a free market to maximise profits though efficiencies and
taking advantage of competitive advantages between themselves.
Which leaves us in to-days developing mess.
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
EVs are
often charged overnight. From above, there is currently an advantage
to our system in using off peak power, but that may not last.
Psst! The hydro lakes can only produce power until they are empty.
Not a good look, so Huntly has to generate.

[snip]
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
For the owner of Manapouri, high demand is desirable, and closing the
smelter may release too much supply to sustain prices in the South
Isaland at least. The link across Cook Strait is possibly running
close to capacity; there may be advantages in spending the capital to
allow higher delivery north, but transmission losses suggest we should
be developing generation in the North Island anyway. In the short term
the answer is that for the North Island, prices are likely to
increase, which may make it more desirable for individuals and groups
to develop more solar generation. In the meantime, raising prices may
assist generate some of the capital needed for that development.
Given that we have such an effective market, the question does need to
be asked as to why some believe the governmen should be doing the work
for those market participants - if demand increases, then after prices
have increased sufficiently there will be an incentive for companies
to develop further generation as needed.
Argh! The power companies want max profits, they care not if the power
supply is is third world as long as they are cranking in the profits.

So at some point when the price of power is several $/KWh someone starts to
build some more generation. This does not happen over night.

Then there is distribution and sales. All separarte parts.

A good reliable power supply is something everyone wants, so there needs to
be electricity forms along the line of the proposed water reforms. (Tounge
in cheek)
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Are those wanting the government to "do something" prepared to pay for
that work? Or should they be charging the current electricity industry
body that is already doing projections of generation and demand and
sharing the results? Should the government set up a generation company
to compete in the industry itself? Or do those calling for the
government to get involved just have shares in current companies and
want a subsidy?
The Government is put there to run the country, we all want a good power
supply. As things stand the Government can cry Let the market forces Govern.
Penny to a pound they do as well as the Government
Post by Crash
You have completely the wrong angle Rich80105 because it is your only
defence. The Government has embarked on an initiative to encourage us
to buy EV's in preference to ICE vehicles, but has no plan to migrate
our electricity grid to supply them with that from 'green' energy
sources. The nature of the current market is irrelevant.
Well, yes and no. It would be alot easier if we, the people (the Government)
had control of the generation, distribution and sales.
Post by Crash
The
presence or absence of the Tiwai Smelter is also irrelevant, because
the power consumption it currently uses is so trivial (compared to hat
required to supply electricity to EV's) that even if the smelter shut
down it buys too short a buffer period. The Government clearly has no
idea what the impact on electricity supply would be if we reached
their nirvana of transport that is EV-based. If the Government
succeeds in this we will not be able to get the required new levels of
electricity supply online fast enough, regardless of whether the
industry is privately funded or remains dominated by SOE's as it is
now. That is the thrust from the Geekzone poster.
I am totally with him.

The lack pf planning, using real world figures, all put together in a
report. It is not rocket science, just some real world figures and some
thinking it through.
Crash
2021-07-21 08:27:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gordon
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Post by Crash
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:54:30 -0500, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
?Around 35 per cent of Wellington city?s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don?t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,? Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
There is an interesting thread on this subject on geekzone - an
NZ-based technology website. In that thread there is a post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate and the supply at any other time of the day is
non-existent (because Huntly is keeping the whole system afloat).
Well, Huntly can not be taken off line without many votes being lost, along
with the power supply.
Logic says that if we are going EV 100% by 2030 and allowing for the climate
emergency, the Government should b\at the very least have a plan to
decomissioning Huntly without the lights going out. Rich, is there one?
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Post by Crash
The fact is that if EV's are successfully marketed and sold, we need
to plan now for the increased clean-green generating capacity in order
for it to come online in the next 10 to 20 years.
No, to-day as Huntly needs to be decommisioned now. First thing first.
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
A government some years ago took steps to remove government from both
electricity generation or distribution; we now have a market place
with a number of competing companies for each stage of delivery,
working in a free market to maximise profits though efficiencies and
taking advantage of competitive advantages between themselves.
Which leaves us in to-days developing mess.
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
EVs are
often charged overnight. From above, there is currently an advantage
to our system in using off peak power, but that may not last.
Psst! The hydro lakes can only produce power until they are empty.
Not a good look, so Huntly has to generate.
[snip]
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
For the owner of Manapouri, high demand is desirable, and closing the
smelter may release too much supply to sustain prices in the South
Isaland at least. The link across Cook Strait is possibly running
close to capacity; there may be advantages in spending the capital to
allow higher delivery north, but transmission losses suggest we should
be developing generation in the North Island anyway. In the short term
the answer is that for the North Island, prices are likely to
increase, which may make it more desirable for individuals and groups
to develop more solar generation. In the meantime, raising prices may
assist generate some of the capital needed for that development.
Given that we have such an effective market, the question does need to
be asked as to why some believe the governmen should be doing the work
for those market participants - if demand increases, then after prices
have increased sufficiently there will be an incentive for companies
to develop further generation as needed.
Argh! The power companies want max profits, they care not if the power
supply is is third world as long as they are cranking in the profits.
So at some point when the price of power is several $/KWh someone starts to
build some more generation. This does not happen over night.
Then there is distribution and sales. All separarte parts.
A good reliable power supply is something everyone wants, so there needs to
be electricity forms along the line of the proposed water reforms. (Tounge
in cheek)
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Are those wanting the government to "do something" prepared to pay for
that work? Or should they be charging the current electricity industry
body that is already doing projections of generation and demand and
sharing the results? Should the government set up a generation company
to compete in the industry itself? Or do those calling for the
government to get involved just have shares in current companies and
want a subsidy?
The Government is put there to run the country, we all want a good power
supply. As things stand the Government can cry Let the market forces Govern.
Penny to a pound they do as well as the Government
Post by Crash
You have completely the wrong angle Rich80105 because it is your only
defence. The Government has embarked on an initiative to encourage us
to buy EV's in preference to ICE vehicles, but has no plan to migrate
our electricity grid to supply them with that from 'green' energy
sources. The nature of the current market is irrelevant.
Well, yes and no. It would be alot easier if we, the people (the Government)
had control of the generation, distribution and sales.
The Government majority-owns all the generators except Contact, along
with Transpower. Which part of this picture do you think the
Government does not control?
Post by Gordon
Post by Crash
The
presence or absence of the Tiwai Smelter is also irrelevant, because
the power consumption it currently uses is so trivial (compared to hat
required to supply electricity to EV's) that even if the smelter shut
down it buys too short a buffer period. The Government clearly has no
idea what the impact on electricity supply would be if we reached
their nirvana of transport that is EV-based. If the Government
succeeds in this we will not be able to get the required new levels of
electricity supply online fast enough, regardless of whether the
industry is privately funded or remains dominated by SOE's as it is
now. That is the thrust from the Geekzone poster.
I am totally with him.
The lack pf planning, using real world figures, all put together in a
report. It is not rocket science, just some real world figures and some
thinking it through.
The planning is a problem because the options must be 'green'.


--
Crash McBash
Rich80105
2021-07-21 09:54:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Crash
Post by Gordon
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Post by Crash
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:54:30 -0500, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
?Around 35 per cent of Wellington city?s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don?t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,? Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
There is an interesting thread on this subject on geekzone - an
NZ-based technology website. In that thread there is a post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate and the supply at any other time of the day is
non-existent (because Huntly is keeping the whole system afloat).
Well, Huntly can not be taken off line without many votes being lost, along
with the power supply.
Logic says that if we are going EV 100% by 2030 and allowing for the climate
emergency, the Government should b\at the very least have a plan to
decomissioning Huntly without the lights going out. Rich, is there one?
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Post by Crash
The fact is that if EV's are successfully marketed and sold, we need
to plan now for the increased clean-green generating capacity in order
for it to come online in the next 10 to 20 years.
No, to-day as Huntly needs to be decommisioned now. First thing first.
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
A government some years ago took steps to remove government from both
electricity generation or distribution; we now have a market place
with a number of competing companies for each stage of delivery,
working in a free market to maximise profits though efficiencies and
taking advantage of competitive advantages between themselves.
Which leaves us in to-days developing mess.
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
EVs are
often charged overnight. From above, there is currently an advantage
to our system in using off peak power, but that may not last.
Psst! The hydro lakes can only produce power until they are empty.
Not a good look, so Huntly has to generate.
[snip]
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
For the owner of Manapouri, high demand is desirable, and closing the
smelter may release too much supply to sustain prices in the South
Isaland at least. The link across Cook Strait is possibly running
close to capacity; there may be advantages in spending the capital to
allow higher delivery north, but transmission losses suggest we should
be developing generation in the North Island anyway. In the short term
the answer is that for the North Island, prices are likely to
increase, which may make it more desirable for individuals and groups
to develop more solar generation. In the meantime, raising prices may
assist generate some of the capital needed for that development.
Given that we have such an effective market, the question does need to
be asked as to why some believe the governmen should be doing the work
for those market participants - if demand increases, then after prices
have increased sufficiently there will be an incentive for companies
to develop further generation as needed.
Argh! The power companies want max profits, they care not if the power
supply is is third world as long as they are cranking in the profits.
So at some point when the price of power is several $/KWh someone starts to
build some more generation. This does not happen over night.
Then there is distribution and sales. All separarte parts.
A good reliable power supply is something everyone wants, so there needs to
be electricity forms along the line of the proposed water reforms. (Tounge
in cheek)
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Are those wanting the government to "do something" prepared to pay for
that work? Or should they be charging the current electricity industry
body that is already doing projections of generation and demand and
sharing the results? Should the government set up a generation company
to compete in the industry itself? Or do those calling for the
government to get involved just have shares in current companies and
want a subsidy?
The Government is put there to run the country, we all want a good power
supply. As things stand the Government can cry Let the market forces Govern.
Penny to a pound they do as well as the Government
Post by Crash
You have completely the wrong angle Rich80105 because it is your only
defence. The Government has embarked on an initiative to encourage us
to buy EV's in preference to ICE vehicles, but has no plan to migrate
our electricity grid to supply them with that from 'green' energy
sources. The nature of the current market is irrelevant.
Well, yes and no. It would be alot easier if we, the people (the Government)
had control of the generation, distribution and sales.
The Government majority-owns all the generators except Contact, along
with Transpower. Which part of this picture do you think the
Government does not control?
Post by Gordon
Post by Crash
The
presence or absence of the Tiwai Smelter is also irrelevant, because
the power consumption it currently uses is so trivial (compared to hat
required to supply electricity to EV's) that even if the smelter shut
down it buys too short a buffer period. The Government clearly has no
idea what the impact on electricity supply would be if we reached
their nirvana of transport that is EV-based. If the Government
succeeds in this we will not be able to get the required new levels of
electricity supply online fast enough, regardless of whether the
industry is privately funded or remains dominated by SOE's as it is
now. That is the thrust from the Geekzone poster.
I am totally with him.
The lack pf planning, using real world figures, all put together in a
report. It is not rocket science, just some real world figures and some
thinking it through.
The planning is a problem because the options must be 'green'.
There has been planning going on, and that will be continuing. One
generator had plans to build more generaton when the smelter closur
was being discussed - they were put on hold at that time, but can be
brought forward again fairly quickly.

In reality the move to electric vehicles will be fairly slow from some
persepctives anyway - they are more expensive which many cannot
afford; but there is an issue of supplying the EVs in the first place
- with Covid affecting freight takeup may be delayed for that reason.
I suspect we will move back to using sea and rail transport more
efficiently for freight; air travel will get more expensive, it will
take a few years for the covid pandemic to be brought under control in
some parts of the world.

The smelter has been using about 13% of total electricity, but the
closure will just highlight the need for more generation in the North
Island - the south may becoemore attractive to industries that use
electric power.

Looking gor 'green' generation is not really much of a problem as we
have used much of our 'dirty'generation already.
John Bowes
2021-07-21 11:32:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rich80105
Post by Crash
Post by Gordon
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Post by Crash
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:54:30 -0500, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
?Around 35 per cent of Wellington city?s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don?t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,? Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
There is an interesting thread on this subject on geekzone - an
NZ-based technology website. In that thread there is a post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate and the supply at any other time of the day is
non-existent (because Huntly is keeping the whole system afloat).
Well, Huntly can not be taken off line without many votes being lost, along
with the power supply.
Logic says that if we are going EV 100% by 2030 and allowing for the climate
emergency, the Government should b\at the very least have a plan to
decomissioning Huntly without the lights going out. Rich, is there one?
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Post by Crash
The fact is that if EV's are successfully marketed and sold, we need
to plan now for the increased clean-green generating capacity in order
for it to come online in the next 10 to 20 years.
No, to-day as Huntly needs to be decommisioned now. First thing first.
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
A government some years ago took steps to remove government from both
electricity generation or distribution; we now have a market place
with a number of competing companies for each stage of delivery,
working in a free market to maximise profits though efficiencies and
taking advantage of competitive advantages between themselves.
Which leaves us in to-days developing mess.
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
EVs are
often charged overnight. From above, there is currently an advantage
to our system in using off peak power, but that may not last.
Psst! The hydro lakes can only produce power until they are empty.
Not a good look, so Huntly has to generate.
[snip]
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
For the owner of Manapouri, high demand is desirable, and closing the
smelter may release too much supply to sustain prices in the South
Isaland at least. The link across Cook Strait is possibly running
close to capacity; there may be advantages in spending the capital to
allow higher delivery north, but transmission losses suggest we should
be developing generation in the North Island anyway. In the short term
the answer is that for the North Island, prices are likely to
increase, which may make it more desirable for individuals and groups
to develop more solar generation. In the meantime, raising prices may
assist generate some of the capital needed for that development.
Given that we have such an effective market, the question does need to
be asked as to why some believe the governmen should be doing the work
for those market participants - if demand increases, then after prices
have increased sufficiently there will be an incentive for companies
to develop further generation as needed.
Argh! The power companies want max profits, they care not if the power
supply is is third world as long as they are cranking in the profits.
So at some point when the price of power is several $/KWh someone starts to
build some more generation. This does not happen over night.
Then there is distribution and sales. All separarte parts.
A good reliable power supply is something everyone wants, so there needs to
be electricity forms along the line of the proposed water reforms. (Tounge
in cheek)
Post by Crash
Post by Rich80105
Are those wanting the government to "do something" prepared to pay for
that work? Or should they be charging the current electricity industry
body that is already doing projections of generation and demand and
sharing the results? Should the government set up a generation company
to compete in the industry itself? Or do those calling for the
government to get involved just have shares in current companies and
want a subsidy?
The Government is put there to run the country, we all want a good power
supply. As things stand the Government can cry Let the market forces Govern.
Penny to a pound they do as well as the Government
Post by Crash
You have completely the wrong angle Rich80105 because it is your only
defence. The Government has embarked on an initiative to encourage us
to buy EV's in preference to ICE vehicles, but has no plan to migrate
our electricity grid to supply them with that from 'green' energy
sources. The nature of the current market is irrelevant.
Well, yes and no. It would be alot easier if we, the people (the Government)
had control of the generation, distribution and sales.
The Government majority-owns all the generators except Contact, along
with Transpower. Which part of this picture do you think the
Government does not control?
Post by Gordon
Post by Crash
The
presence or absence of the Tiwai Smelter is also irrelevant, because
the power consumption it currently uses is so trivial (compared to hat
required to supply electricity to EV's) that even if the smelter shut
down it buys too short a buffer period. The Government clearly has no
idea what the impact on electricity supply would be if we reached
their nirvana of transport that is EV-based. If the Government
succeeds in this we will not be able to get the required new levels of
electricity supply online fast enough, regardless of whether the
industry is privately funded or remains dominated by SOE's as it is
now. That is the thrust from the Geekzone poster.
I am totally with him.
The lack pf planning, using real world figures, all put together in a
report. It is not rocket science, just some real world figures and some
thinking it through.
The planning is a problem because the options must be 'green'.
There has been planning going on, and that will be continuing. One
generator had plans to build more generaton when the smelter closur
was being discussed - they were put on hold at that time, but can be
brought forward again fairly quickly.
Prove it Rich! This looks like more of your unsupported bullshit!
<another unsupported pipe dream snipped>pipe dream
Post by Rich80105
The smelter has been using about 13% of total electricity, but the
closure will just highlight the need for more generation in the North
Island - the south may becoemore attractive to industries that use
electric power.
The closure will be happening about the time a bunch of Labours quasi MP's are looking for work Rich all going well. Even if they're not tossed in 2024 they'll probably do a deal to keep the southland locals on side for the election.
Post by Rich80105
Looking gor 'green' generation is not really much of a problem as we
have used much of our 'dirty'generation already.
We still are Rich. In fact Huntly is using the dirtiest coal possible AND it's been imported thus putting local coalminers out of work!
James Christophers
2021-07-20 06:00:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Crash
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:54:30 -0500, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
There is an interesting thread on this subject on geekzone - an
NZ-based technology website. In that thread there is a post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate and the supply at any other time of the day is
non-existent (because Huntly is keeping the whole system afloat).
The fact is that if EV's are successfully marketed and sold, we need
to plan now for the increased clean-green generating capacity in order
for it to come online in the next 10 to 20 years. The current
Government seems to be unaware of this or they think we can wait to
see how market trends with EV's shape up.
https://www.transpower.co.nz/power-system-live-data
(Prevously posted)

About ten days ago on a cold and frosty morning the realtime load at 0820hrs peaked at 6,820MW. (I made a note of it for future reference as now.)

New Zealand's maximum total generating capacity today reportedly stands at approx 9,300MW .

As for the EV "trend" you mention, I'm just wondering how this would pan out when already ageing models damned from the get-go by the spectre of an inevitable battery replacement turn out to be way more a liability rather than an asset? After all, when has anyone buying an 8 year-old Corolla with 100,000km on the clock been told that the heap he facies would be due for a $10,000 fuel tank replacement any time from the moment he takes possession?
John Bowes
2021-07-20 06:53:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Crash
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:54:30 -0500, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net
Post by Tony
Post by Rich80105
On Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:24:55 -0700 (PDT), John Bowes
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them
Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers
unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
There are already quite a few chargers in Auckland - see
https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/ev-charging-locations/
There are maps for locations of public chargers elsewhere in New
Zealand as well. In theory over time we will need more public charging
and fewer petrol pumps - some locations around New Zealand already
provide both; but most charging is likely to be done while a vehicle
is parked at home; I know of one person who has solar panels on the
house roof and electricity generated is stored in a battery, which is
used first for charging an EV.
Nobody in government is addressing the real issue. How is the electricity going
to be generated and stored? In your case you simply don't understand the
question.
There is an interesting thread on this subject on geekzone - an
NZ-based technology website. In that thread there is a post with
cites that identifies that generating and transmission capacity to
supply the load required for just off-peak (overnight) EV recharging
is inadequate and the supply at any other time of the day is
non-existent (because Huntly is keeping the whole system afloat).
The fact is that if EV's are successfully marketed and sold, we need
to plan now for the increased clean-green generating capacity in order
for it to come online in the next 10 to 20 years. The current
Government seems to be unaware of this or they think we can wait to
see how market trends with EV's shape up.
--
Crash McBash
10 or 20 years time is to far in the future Crash. The government should have it in place now. Or if they were any more than pushing a stupid left wing agenda they would! Hell even without EVs we need more renewable regeneration not to rely on wind and solar which will NEVER provide energy 24/7!
George Black
2021-07-19 20:17:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Bowes
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
WOW! A whole THIRTY chargers. Great but what are they going to use in them Rich. They'll need a couple of power stations to power all the other chargers unless the plan is to restrict EV cars to Wellington :)
The longer this farce goes the more crap is going to be museum pieces in
the future.
And no garages for the 'new' housing projects means open slather for the
car thieves
Gordon
2021-07-19 08:54:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
Now lets think this through. After all someone has to do it.

Jane Matai lives in a house/flat/apartment with no off street parking. As
does 50 other people in the street. All have EV's. Jane comes home and
either finds all the fast chargers taken or is lucky enough to find a free
one. She plugs in and get up the next morning, say 12 hours plus later, goes
down and uplugs the car and drives off.

The charging space has been under utilised as 12 hours are not needed to
charge up for the next day. Could have done at least two.

You can not pull the plug out of a car which is locked.

Jane has a bad run of bad luck and battery goes flat in the rush hour
traffic.

Public fast chargers are really only good in high turn over areas.
Supermarket car parks say.
BR
2021-07-19 17:26:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
The Government subsidy is welcome news for the Mayor of Wellington who
"Wellington Mayor Andy Foster said the $498,785 allocated would help
the council reach its goal of becoming a carbon-neutral capital by
2050.
“Around 35 per cent of Wellington city’s emissions come from road
transport, so this is an opportunity to support Wellingtonians who
want to transition to an EV [electric vehicle], but don’t have access
to off- street parking or garaging,” Foster said."
Electric cars are one of the stupidest things to result from the
mitigation the man made climate change fraud. They offer no advantage
whatsoever, and nobody would have a bar of them but for government
subsidies, kickbacks and climate scaremongering.

Bill.
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Willy Nilly
2021-07-19 21:48:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rich80105
https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington/125740086/wellington-to-get-30-more-electric-vehicle-fast-chargers?
Once the blackouts start happening, due to the governments anti-energy
policies, the market for EVs will crater pretty quick.
Loading...