Discussion:
Overly partisan USA becomes disfunctional
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Rich80105
2020-04-28 03:17:48 UTC
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https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/27/opinion/coronavirus-state-budgets.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

Thanks goodness we have all parties broadly in agreement that the
government shold have given the grants for wages, should be bringing
forward some projects to provide labour, etc., and also support our
cities also needing to cover activities that are their responsibility,
which may more directly lead to some rate increases.
Gordon
2020-04-28 04:57:26 UTC
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Post by Rich80105
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/27/opinion/coronavirus-state-budgets.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage
Thanks goodness we have all parties broadly in agreement that the
government shold have given the grants for wages, should be bringing
forward some projects to provide labour, etc., and also support our
cities also needing to cover activities that are their responsibility,
which may more directly lead to some rate increases.
I constantly struggle at times to understand how The U S of A system is a
good one. Still our friends across the ditch have a similar one but seem to
make it work.

Still at the present it would be very hard for the U S of A to agree on the
day of the week.
Tony
2020-04-28 23:13:10 UTC
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Post by Gordon
Post by Rich80105
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/27/opinion/coronavirus-state-budgets.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage
Thanks goodness we have all parties broadly in agreement that the
government shold have given the grants for wages, should be bringing
forward some projects to provide labour, etc., and also support our
cities also needing to cover activities that are their responsibility,
which may more directly lead to some rate increases.
I constantly struggle at times to understand how The U S of A system is a
good one. Still our friends across the ditch have a similar one but seem to
make it work.
Still at the present it would be very hard for the U S of A to agree on the
day of the week.
The two systems really are not that similar. The US has an elected president
that holds enormous power. Australia, like here, has a Governor General who has
very little real power so that means a consensus is required to govern. The USA
is arguably an oligarchy but Australia and New Zealand are certainly not.
James Christophers
2020-04-29 00:36:25 UTC
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Post by Gordon
Post by Rich80105
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/27/opinion/coronavirus-state-budgets.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage
Thanks goodness we have all parties broadly in agreement that the
government shold have given the grants for wages, should be bringing
forward some projects to provide labour, etc., and also support our
cities also needing to cover activities that are their responsibility,
which may more directly lead to some rate increases.
I constantly struggle at times to understand how The U S of A system is a
good one. Still our friends across the ditch have a similar one but seem to
make it work.
Still at the present it would be very hard for the U S of A to agree on the
day of the week.
The American Constitution embodies a system that authorises a president to invoke his own veto and/or his issuing of an executive order. It therefore overrides the democratic process.

The US Constitution also embodies a parliamentary system but one where a filibuster can be invoked with impunity to delay or “talk out” a bill in order to block and therefore effectively expunge it. Again, the democratic process is severely compromised.

In both cases, corruption must ensue as night follows day.

The seasoned arch-exponent of the filibuster is Senate majority leader, Republican Mitch McConnell, and much damage and disrepute has he brought not only on himself, but on Democracy and his nation’s international relationships and good standing.

Frankly, how such wanton behaviours can be called “The exercise of Democracy under the Constitution” baffles even the most reasonable of thinkers, including Americans themselves.

The US’s federal system vests power in both Washington (White House and Congress) and in all individual 50 States of the Union. When it comes to a necessarily national issue, it should and must be the Federal government that shoulders responsibility for dealing with it from start to finish, even more so when the threat is plainly existential, invisible and capricious and 100% universal among the citizenry.

But no.

Trump has shuffled off all significant procurement, planning, coordinating, i.e. total hands-on responsibility, onto the individual States themselves as autonomous enactors and providers of help to their people. So, instead of Washington undertaking the entire planning, coordinating and sharing out of resources as a central-government obligation, he’s palmed it off onto the 50 disunited States to fight it out between themselves.

So battle lines are drawn. Chaos ensues. Lives are lost - as of this writing, something like 57,000 of them.

Unequivocally, Trump and Congress have together automatically disavowed and, at a stroke, abdicated their duties and responsibilities to their people as their joint governors and protectors.

Fifty-seven thousand deaths say so.

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